Sunday, April 22, 2012

1995-96 Chicago Bulls

In the 1995–96 season, the Chicago Bulls set an NBA record by becoming the first team to win 70 regular season games. They finished the season with a record of 72–10 and would go on to defeat the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1996 NBA Finals.

Prior the 1995–96 NBA season, Dennis Rodman and Jack Haley were traded from the Spurs to the Bulls for Will Perdue and cash considerations to fill a large void at power forward left by Horace Grant, who left the Bulls prior to the 1994–95 NBA season.

Haley only played in 1 game during the regular season and didn't participate in the playoffs. He was best known for his friendship with the enigmatic Rodman.

In his book Bad as I Wanna Be, Rodman stated that Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen had to approve the trade before it took place. Rodman chose the number 91 (9+1=10 according to Rodman for why he chose that number) for his jersey since #10 was retired by the Bulls in 1995 in honor of Bob Love.

Pos. # Nat. Name Ht. Wt. From
PG 0 Brown, Randy 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 190 lb (86 kg) New Mexico State
SG 30 Buechler, Jud 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Arizona
PF 35 Caffey, Jason 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 255 lb (116 kg) Alabama
C 53 Edwards, James 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 225 lb (102 kg) Washington
PF 54 Haley, Jack 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 240 lb (109 kg) UCLA
SG 9 Harper, Ron 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Miami (OH)
SG 23 Jordan, Michael (C) 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 215 lb (98 kg) North Carolina
PG 25 Kerr, Steve 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 175 lb (79 kg) Arizona
SF 7 Kukoc, Toni 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Croatia
C 13 Longley, Luc 7 ft 2 in (2.18 m) 265 lb (120 kg) New Mexico
SF 33 Pippen, Scottie (C) 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 218 lb (99 kg) Central Arkansas
PF 91 Rodman, Dennis 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 220 lb (100 kg) SE Oklahoma State
C 22 Salley, John 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 230 lb (104 kg) Georgia Tech
PF 8 Simpkins, Dickey 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 248 lb (112 kg) Providence
C 34 Wennington, Bill 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 245 lb (111 kg) St. John's


Head coach

Phil Jackson (North Dakota)

Assistant coach(es)

Jim Cleamons (Ohio State)
Jim Rodgers (Iowa)
John Paxson (Notre Dame)
Tex Winter (Southern California)

Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, and Dennis Rodman led Chicago to the NBA Finals as the Bulls had a historic run. The Bulls finished 72–10 in the regular season to break the 1971–72 Lakers' record of 69 wins in a season. In his first full season since returning to the NBA, Jordan won his eighth scoring title to break Wilt Chamberlain's record of seven and also came away with a triple crown of awards: the MVP awards for the regular season, All-Star Game and NBA Finals. The Bulls improved 25 games from the previous year's 47–35 record to their all-time record 72 regular season wins. In addition, they would go on to set another regular season landmark by becoming the fastest team to 41 wins; by going 41–3 before losing their 4th game that year, which was also a record once held by the 1971–72 Los Angeles Lakers, who got off to a 39–3 start. They would win 33 road games, setting yet another NBA record. They also had a 39–2 home record, which was one win shy of tying the Boston Celtics for best home record in history. For these reasons, many fans and media members regard the 1995–96 Chicago Bulls to be the greatest NBA team of all time.

Later, in the playoffs, the Bulls easily made their way to the NBA Finals and the NBA championship. Rodman, Jordan, and Scottie Pippen all made the All-Defensive First Team, the first time three players from the same team made it on the first team. Rodman led the league in rebounding for the fifth straight year, and Jordan won the scoring title, the second time that teammates had led the league in scoring and rebounding.

Saturday, April 21, 2012

1986-87 Los Angeles Lakers

1986–87 Los Angeles Lakers season
Tenth NBA Championship
Head coach Pat Riley
Owner(s) Jerry Buss
Arena The Forum
Results
Record 65–17 (.793)
Place Division: 1st (Pacific)
Conference: 1st (Western)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television Prime Ticket, KHJ
Radio AM 570 KLAC
Los Angeles Lakers seasons

The highlight of the Los Angeles Lakers season was winning the NBA title over the defending champions, the Boston Celtics.

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Brady Lynch Mychal Thompson Mike Smrek
PF A. C. Green Kurt Rambis
SF James Worthy Billy Thompson Adrian Branch
SG Byron Scott Michael Cooper
PG Magic Johnson Wes Matthews

Player GP MPG REB AST STL BLK PTS PPG
Magic Johnson 80 36.3 504 977 138 36 1909 23.9
James Worthy 82 34.4 466 226 108 83 1594 19.4
Byron Scott 82 33.3 286 281 125 18 1397 17.0
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 78 31.3 523 203 49 97 1366 17.5
Michael Cooper 82 27.5 254 373 78 43 859 10.5
A.C. Green 79 28.4 615 84 70 80 852 10.8
Kurt Rambis 78 19.4 453 63 74 41 446 5.7
Mychal Thompson 33 20.6 136 28 14 30 333 10.1
Billy Thompson 59 12.9 171 60 15 30 332 5.6
Wes Matthews 50 10.6 47 100 23 4 208 4.2
Frank Brickowski 37 10.9 97 12 14 4 146 3.9
Adrian Branch 32 6.8 53 16 16 3 138 4.3
Mike Smrek 35 6.7 37 5 4 13 76 2.2

Magic Johnson, NBA Most Valuable Player
Magic Johnson, NBA Finals Most Valuable Player

Friday, April 20, 2012

1985-86 Boston Celtics

1985–86 Boston Celtics season
Sixteenth NBA Championship
Head coach K. C. Jones
Owner(s) Don Gaston, Alan Cohen, Paul Dupee
Arena Boston Garden
Hartford Civic Center
Results
Record 67–15 (.817)
Place Division: 1st (Atlantic)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television SportsChannel New England, WLVI, WTXX
Radio WRKO, WTIC

In 1985-86 the Celtics fielded one of the best teams in NBA history. The 1986 Celtics won 67 games, going 40-1 at home (37-1 at the Boston Garden, 3-0 at the Hartford Civic Center). Bird won his third consecutive MVP award after having arguably his finest season, and Walton won the Sixth Man of the Year Award. They would win their 16th championship and last for 22 years, defeating the Houston Rockets in 6 games in the NBA Finals.

The 1985 NBA Draft took place on June 18, 1985. It was also the first NBA Draft of the "Lottery" era. The lottery was put into place so teams could not intentionally lose games to receive the number one pick.
Round Pick Player Position Nationality School/Club Team
1 20 Sam Vincent Guard United States Michigan State
3 70 Andre Battle Guard United States Loyola (IL)
4 93 Cliff Webber Forward United States Liberty Baptist
5 116 Albert Butts Forward United States La Salle
6 139 Ralph Lewis Guard United States La Salle
7 162 Chris Remly United States Rutgers

Player GP REB AST STL BLK PTS AVG
Larry Bird 82 805 557 166 51 2115 25.8
Kevin McHale 68 551 181 29 164 1448 21.3
Robert Parish 81 770 145 65 116 1305 16.1
Dennis Johnson 78 268 456 110 35 1213 15.6
Danny Ainge 80 235 405 94 7 855 10.7
Scott Wedman 79 192 82 38 22 634 8.0
Bill Walton 80 544 165 38 106 606 7.6
Jerry Sichting 82 104 188 50 0 537 6.5
David Thirdkill 49 70 15 11 3 163 3.3
Sam Vincent 57 48 69 17 4 184 3.2
Sly Williams 6 15 2 1 1 17 2.8
Rick Carlisle 77 77 104 19 4 199 2.6
Greg Kite 64 128 17 3 28 83 1.3

Pos. # Name Height Weight DOB (Y–M–D) From
G/F 44 Ainge, Danny 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) 175 lb (79 kg) Brigham Young
F 33 Bird, Larry (C) 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Indiana State University
G 34 Carlisle, Rick 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) 210 lb (95 kg) Virginia
G 3 Johnson, Dennis 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Pepperdine
C 50 Kite, Greg 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 250 lb (113 kg) 1961–08–05 Brigham Young
F/C 32 McHale, Kevin 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 210 lb (95 kg) 1957–12–19 Minnesota
C 00 Parish, Robert 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 230 lb (104 kg) Centenary College of Louisiana
G 12 Sichting, Jerry 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 168 lb (76 kg) Purdue
F 45 Thirdkill, David 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 195 lb (88 kg) Bradley
G 11 Vincent, Sam 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Michigan State
C 5 Walton, Bill 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 235 lb (107 kg) UCLA
G 8 Wedman, Scott 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 215 lb (98 kg) Colorado
G/F 35 Williams, Sly 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 210 lb (95 kg) Rhode Island


Head coach

K.C. Jones (San Francisco)

Assistant coach(es)

Jimmy Rodgers (Ohio State)
Chris Ford (Villanova)

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Robert Parish Bill Walton Greg Kite
PF Kevin McHale
SF Larry Bird David Thirdkill
SG Danny Ainge Scott Wedman Rick Carlisle
PG Dennis Johnson Jerry Sichting Sam Vincent

Thursday, April 19, 2012

1971-72 Los Angeles Lakers

1971–72 Los Angeles Lakers season
Sixth NBA Championship
Head coach Bill Sharman
Owner(s) Jack Kent Cooke
Arena The Forum
Results
Record 69–13 (.841)
Place Division: 1st (Pacific)
Conference: 1st (Western)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television KTLA
Radio KABC

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Wilt Chamberlain LeRoy Ellis
PF Happy Hairston John Trapp
SF Jim McMillian Pat Riley Keith Erickson
SG Jerry West Jim Cleamons
PG Gail Goodrich Flynn Robinson

Player GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG
Elgin Baylor 9 26.6 .433 .815 6.3 2.0 11.8
Wilt Chamberlain 82 42.3 .649 .422 19.2 4.0 14.8
Jim Cleamons 38 5.3 .350 .778 1.0 0.9 2.6
LeRoy Ellis 74 14.6 .460 .695 4.2 0.6 4.6
Keith Erickson 15 17.5 .482 .857 2.6 2.3 5.7
Gail Goodrich 82 37.1 .487 .850 3.6 4.5 25.9
Happy Hairston 80 34.4 .461 .779 13.1 2.4 13.1
Jim McMillian 80 38.1 .482 .791 6.5 2.6 18.8
Pat Riley 67 13.8 .447 .743 1.9 1.1 6.7
Flynn Robinson 64 15.7 .490 .860 1.8 2.2 9.9
John Trapp 58 13.1 .443 .699 3.1 0.7 5.7
Jerry West 77 38.6 .477 .814 4.2 9.7 25.8

Game 1

Although without Willis Reed because of his knee injury. Jerry Lucas scored 26 points but was only one of several Knicks who was red hot. Bill Bradley hit 11 of 12 shots from the field as New York shot 53 percent for the game. The team took advantage of a nearly perfect first half to jump to a good lead and won easily, 114-92. Early in the second half, the Forum crowd began filing out dejectedly. It looked like another Los Angeles fold in the Finals.

Game 2

Knicks forward Dave DeBusschere hurt his side and didn't play after the first half. Hairston scored 12 points in the second half, and Los Angeles evened the series with a 106-92 win.

Game 3

DeBusschere attempted to play in the first half and missed all six of his field-goal attempts. He was hurting and elected not to play in the second half. DeBusschere explained :"I didn't feel I was helping the team,". The Lakers danced out to a 22-point lead and regained the home-court advantage with a 107-96 win.

Game 4

The game went into overtime, but at the end of regulation, Wilt Chamberlain picked up his fifth foul. In 13 NBA seasons, he had never fouled out of a game, a statistic of which he was immensely proud. Immediately speculation started along press row that he would play soft in the overtime. Instead, he came out in a shotblocking fury that propelled the Lakers to a 116-111 win. At three games to one, their lead now seemed insurmountable.

Game 5

The Lakers won their sixth NBA championship by the score of 114-100. This was their first championship since moving to Los Angeles in 1960. Jerry West also won his first NBA championship after 12 years of waiting. Wilt Chamberlain scored 24 points and 29 rebounds and earned the NBA Finals MVP Award.

Award winners

Bill Sharman, NBA Coach of the Year
Jerry West, All-NBA First Team
Jerry West, All-NBA Defensive First Team
Wilt Chamberlain, All-NBA Defensive First Team
Wilt Chamberlain, NBA Leader, Shooting Percentage (.649

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

1988-89 Detroit Pistons

1988–89 Detroit Pistons season
First NBA Championship
Head coach Chuck Daly
Owner(s) William Davidson
Arena The Palace of Auburn Hills
Results
Record 63–19 (.768)
Place Division: 1st (Central)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television PASS Sports, WKBD
Radio WCXI

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Bill Laimbeer James Edwards
PF Rick Mahorn John Salley
SF Mark Aguirre Dennis Rodman Fennis Dembo
SG Joe Dumars Vinnie Johnson John Long
PG Isiah Thomas Micheal Williams

Player GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
Mark Aguirre 36 32 29.7 .483 .293 .738 4.2 2.5 .44 .19 15.5
Adrian Dantley 42 42 31.9 .521 .000 .839 3.9 2.2 .55 .14 18.4
Darryl Dawkins 14 0 3.4 .474 .000 .500 .5 .1 .00 .07 1.9
Fennis Dembo 31 0 2.4 .333 .000 .800 .7 .2 .03 .00 1.2
Joe Dumars 69 67 34.9 .505 .483 .850 2.5 5.7 .91 .07 17.2
James Edwards 76 1 16.5 .500 .000 .686 3.0 .6 .14 .41 7.3
Steve Harris 3 0 2.3 .250 .000 1.000 .7 .0 .33 .00 1.3
Vinnie Johnson 82 21 25.3 .464 .295 .734 3.1 3.0 .90 .21 13.8
Bill Laimbeer 81 81 32.6 .499 .349 .840 9.6 2.2 .63 1.23 13.7
John Long 24 1 6.3 .475 .000 .846 .5 .6 .00 .08 2.0
Rick Mahorn 72 61 24.9 .517 .000 .748 6.9 .8 .56 .92 7.2
Pace Mannion 5 0 2.8 1.000 .000 .000 .6 .0 .20 .00 .8
Dennis Rodman 82 8 26.9 .595 .231 .626 9.4 1.2 .67 .93 9.0
Jim Rowinski 6 0 1.3 .000 .000 1.000 .3 .0 .00 .00 .7
John Salley 67 21 21.8 .498 .000 .692 5.0 1.1 .60 1.07 7.0
Isiah Thomas 80 76 36.6 .464 .273 .818 3.4 8.3 1.66 .25 18.2
Micheal Williams 49 0 7.3 .364 .222 .660 .6 1.4 .27 .06 2.6

Joe Dumars, NBA Finals Most Valuable Player

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

1996-97 Chicago Bulls

1996–97 Chicago Bulls season
Fifth NBA Championship
Head coach Phil Jackson
Owner(s) Jerry Reinsdorf
Arena United Center
Results
Record 69–13 (.841)
Place Division: 1st (Central)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television SportsChannel Chicago, WGN
Radio WMVP
The Chicago Bulls repeated as NBA World Champions. The Bulls would go on to beat the Utah Jazz in the 1997 NBA Finals. The team was led by Michael Jordan, rebound ace Dennis Rodman and perennial all star small forward Scottie Pippen. Other notable players on the club's roster that year were clutch-specialist Croatian Toni Kukoc, and sharp-shooting point guard Steve Kerr. The Bulls finished with a 69-13 record, just missing out on becoming the first team in NBA history to have back-to-back 70 wins seasons.

Pos. # Nat. Name Ht. Wt. From
PG 1 Brown, Randy 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 190 lb (86 kg) New Mexico State
SG 30 Buechler, Jud 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Arizona
PF 35 Caffey, Jason 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 255 lb (116 kg) Alabama
SG 9 Harper, Ron 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Miami (OH)
SG 23 Jordan, Michael 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 215 lb (98 kg) North Carolina
PG 25 Kerr, Steve 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 175 lb (79 kg) Arizona
SF 7 Kukoc, Toni 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 192 lb (87 kg) Croatia
C 13 Longley, Luc 7 ft 2 in (2.18 m) 265 lb (120 kg) New Mexico
C 00 Parish, Robert 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 235 lb (107 kg) Centenary
SF 33 Pippen, Scottie 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Central Arkansas
PF 91 Rodman, Dennis 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 210 lb (95 kg) SE Oklahoma State
PF 8 Simpkins, Dickey 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 248 lb (112 kg) Providence
SF 6 Steigenga, Matt 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 225 lb (102 kg) Michigan State
C 34 Wennington, Bill 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 245 lb (111 kg) St. John's
C 18 Williams, Brian 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 235 lb (107 kg) Arizona


Head coach

Phil Jackson (North Dakota)

Assistant coach(es)

Bill Cartwright (San Francisco)
Frank Hamblen (Syracuse)
Jim Rodgers (Iowa)
Tex Winter (Southern California)

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Luc Longley Brian Williams Robert Parish Bill Wennington
PF Dennis Rodman Jason Caffey Dickey Simpkins
SF Scottie Pippen Toni Kuko─Ź
SG Michael Jordan Jud Buechler
PG Ron Harper Steve Kerr Randy Brown

Monday, April 16, 2012

1970-71 Milwaukee Bucks

970–71 Milwaukee Bucks season
First NBA championship
Head coach Larry Costello
Arena Milwaukee Arena
Results
Record 66–16 (.805)
Place Division: 1st (Midwest)
Conference: 1st (Western)
Playoff finish NBA champions

The 1970–71 Milwaukee Bucks season was the third season for the Bucks. Milwaukee posted a 66–16 record in only its third year of existence, and its second since getting Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. A big part of the championship season was the acquisition of "The Big O", Oscar Robertson. Other role players on the Bucks included players such as Bob Dandridge (18.4 ppg) and Jon McGlocklin (15.8 ppg), power forward Greg Smith and key reserves Lucius Allen, Bob Boozer and Dick Cunningham completing the nucleus.

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Lew Alcindor Dick Cunningham
PF Greg Smith Bob Boozer McCoy McLemore
SF Bob Dandridge Bob Greacen
SG Jon McGlocklin Jeff Webb
PG Oscar Robertson Lucius Allen Marv Winkler

In only his second pro season, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (then known as Lew Alcindor) led the league in scoring at 31.7 ppg, ranked second in field goal percentage at .577 and fourth in rebounding at 16.0 rpg. Newly arrived Oscar Robertson turned 32 early in the 1970-71 season, and was past his prime when he came to Milwaukee, but his versatile skills and experience provided a leadership role for the Bucks. Robertson had never won a championship and his desire to win seemed to inspire Abdul-Jabbar and unite the rest of the Bucks. Robertson ranked third in the league in assists at 8.3 apg and was the Bucks' No. 2 scorer at 19.4 ppg.

Sunday, April 15, 2012

1982-83 Philadelphia 76ers

The 1982-83 Philadelphia 76ers season was the 37th season of the franchise (going back to their days as the Syracuse Nationals) and their 20th season in Philadelphia.

Harold Katz bought the 76ers in 1982. On his watch, the final piece of the championship puzzle was completed before the 1982-83 season when they acquired center Moses Malone from the Houston Rockets. Led by Hall of Famer Julius Erving and All-Stars Maurice Cheeks, Andrew Toney, and Bobby Jones they dominated the regular season, winning 65 games in what is still the second most winning year in franchise history.

Malone was named league MVP, and when reporters asked how the playoffs would run, he answered, "four, four, four" — in other words, predicting that the Sixers would sweep all three rounds to win the title, with the minimum 12 games. Malone's deep voice made his boast sound like "fo', fo', fo'."

However, the Sixers backed up Malone's boast. They made a mockery of the Eastern Conference playoffs, first sweeping the New York Knicks and then beating the Milwaukee Bucks in five games. The Sixers went on to win their third NBA championship (and second in Philadelphia) with a four-game sweep of the Los Angeles Lakers, who had defeated them the season before. Malone was named the playoffs' MVP.

The Sixers did not quite fulfill Malone's prediction, as their run took one game over the minimum. Nonetheless, their 12–1 playoff record is the second-best in league history after the 2000-01 Lakers, who went 15–1 en route to the NBA Title coincidentally beating the 76ers in the finals. The Philadelphia-based group Pieces Of A Dream had a minor hit in 1983 with the R&B song "Fo-Fi-Fo", which title was prompted by Malone's quip.

1982–83 Philadelphia 76ers season
Third NBA Championship
Head coach Billy Cunningham
Arena The Spectrum
Results
Record 65–17 (.793)
Place Division: 1st (Atlantic)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television PRISM Network, WPHL
Radio WFLN

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Moses Malone Clemon Johnson Mark McNamara
PF Marc Iavaroni Reggie Johnson Earl Cureton
SF Julius Erving Bobby Jones
SG Andrew Toney Clint Richardson
PG Maurice Cheeks Franklin Edwards

The 76ers went on to capture their second NBA championship as they swept the New York Knicks, and proceeded to beat the Milwaukee Bucks in five games. They finally finished it off with a four game sweep of the Los Angeles Lakers, who had defeated them the season before, making this the only NBA championship not to be won by either the Lakers or the Boston Celtics from 1980–1988.

Said head coach Billy Cunningham, "The difference from last year was Moses." Malone was named MVP of the 1983 Finals, as well as league MVP for the third time in his career. The 76ers completed one of the most dominating playoff runs in league history with a 12-1 mark after league and NBA Finals MVP Moses promised "Fo', fo', fo" (as in "four, four, four" - four wins to sweep round 1, four wins to sweep round 2, etc.), but it actually wound up as "Fo', fi', fo." (four, five, four). The 76ers were also led by Julius Erving, Maurice Cheeks, Andrew Toney, and Bobby Jones.

The 1983 NBA Finals was the last to end before June 1. This championship is especially noted because it would be the last major sports championship for the city of Philadelphia until the Phillies won the 2008 World Series. At the time, no other city with all four professional sports teams had a championship drought last as long as that from 1983-2008 (25 Years). When the Flyers played for the 2010 Stanley Cup, The Ottawa Citizen reported that the main reason for that lengthy championship drought was because the only years the city's teams played for championships during that time were years presidents were inaugurated. The city's teams had lost championships during such years, beginning with the 76ers themselves in 1977. The exceptions were the Phillies in 1983 and the Flyers in 1987.

Following the 1983 NBA Finals, a video documentary called "That Championship Feeling" recaps the NBA Playoff action that year. Dick Stockton narrated the video, and Irene Cara's 1983 hit single "What A Feeling" is the official theme song for the video documentary. For the first time, NBA Entertainment used videotape instead of film for all the on-court and off-court footage.

Saturday, April 14, 2012

1991-92 Chicago Bulls

1991–92 Chicago Bulls season
Second World Championship
Head coach Phil Jackson
Owner(s) Jerry Reinsdorf
Arena Chicago Stadium
Results
Record 67–15 (.817)
Place Division: 1st (Central)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television SportsChannel Chicago, WGN
Radio WMAQ

1991-92 Chicago Bulls roster
Players Coaches
Pos. # Nat. Name Ht. Wt. From
PG 10 Armstrong, B.J. 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 175 lb (79 kg) Iowa
C 24 Cartwright, Bill 7 ft 1 in (2.16 m) 245 lb (111 kg) San Francisco
PF 54 Grant, Horace 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 245 lb (111 kg) Clemson
SG 20 Hansen, Bobby 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 190 lb (86 kg) Iowa
PG 14 Hodges, Craig 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 190 lb (86 kg) Long Beach State
SG 2 Hopson, Dennis 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) 200 lb (91 kg) Ohio State
SG 23 Jordan, Michael 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 215 lb (98 kg) North Carolina
PF 21 King, Stacey 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 230 lb (104 kg) Oklahoma
PF 53 Levingston, Cliff 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 230 lb (104 kg) Wichita State
C 25 Nevitt, Chuck 7 ft 5 in (2.26 m) 217 lb (98 kg) North Carolina State
PG 5 Paxson, John 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Notre Dame
C 32 Perdue, Will 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 240 lb (109 kg) Vanderbilt
SF 33 Pippen, Scottie 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Central Arkansas
PF 52 Randall, Mark 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 235 lb (107 kg) Kansas
PG 2 Sparrow, Rory 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 175 lb (79 kg) Villanova
PF 42 Williams, Scott 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 230 lb (104 kg) North Carolina


Head coach

Phil Jackson (North Dakota)

Assistant coach(es)

Johnny Bach (Fordham)
Jim Cleamons (Ohio State)
Tex Winter (Southern California)

Depth chart
Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Bill Cartwright Will Perdue Scott Williams
PF Horace Grant Stacey King
SF Scottie Pippen Cliff Levingston
SG Michael Jordan Craig Hodges Bobby Hansen
PG John Paxson B. J. Armstrong

Michael Jordan, Associated Press Athlete of the Year
Michael Jordan, All-NBA Team, First Team
Michael Jordan, Guard, NBA Finals MVP
Michael Jordan, NBA All-Defensive First Team

NBA All-Star Game

Michael Jordan, Guard
Scottie Pippen, Forward

Friday, April 13, 2012

1964-65 Boston Celtics

The 1964-65 NBA season was the Celtics' 19th season in the NBA. The Celtics finished the season by winning their eighth NBA Championship. The team was named one of the 10 greatest teams in NBA history. In addition five players were inducted into the hall of fame K.C. Jones, Sam Jones, Tom Heinsohn, Bill Russell, and John Havlicek, three of whom were selected as one of the NBA's 50 greatest players, K.C. Jones, Havlicek, and Russell. Both Coach Auerbach and John Thompson were elected into the hall of fame as coaches.

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Bill Russell Mel Counts
John Thompson
PF Satch Sanders Tom Heinsohn
Willie Naulls
SF John Havlicek Ron Bonham
SG Sam Jones Gerry Ward
PG K. C. Jones Larry Siegfried

1964–65 Boston Celtics season
Eighth NBA Championship
Head coach Red Auerbach
Arena Boston Garden
Results
Record 62–18 (.775)
Place Division: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television WHDH-TV
Radio WHDH

Thursday, April 12, 2012

1972-73 New York Knicks

The 1972–73 New York Knicks season was the 27th season of NBA basketball in New York City, New York. The Knicks capture their second NBA title.

1972–73 New York Knicks season
Second NBA Championship
Head coach Red Holzman
Arena Madison Square Garden
Results
Record 57–25 (.695)
Place Division: 2nd (Atlantic)
Conference: 3rd (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television MSG Network, WOR-TV
Radio WOR Radio

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Willis Reed John Gianelli
PF Dave DeBusschere Jerry Lucas
SF Bill Bradley Phil Jackson Hawthorne Wingo
SG Earl Monroe Dick Barnett
PG Walt Frazier Dean Meminger Henry Bibby

Wednesday, April 11, 2012

2007-08 Boston Celtics

The 2007–08 Boston Celtics season was the 62nd season of the Boston Celtics in the National Basketball Association (NBA). Powered by the acquisitions of perennial All-Stars Kevin Garnett and Ray Allen in the offseason, the Celtics finished with a record of 66–16 and posted the best single-season turnaround in NBA history, improving by 42 wins from the previous season. They finished 1st in both the Atlantic Division and the Eastern Conference, and had the league's best record. The 66 wins were also the second-most in franchise history, behind the 1985-86 Celtics' 67 wins. Kevin Garnett was named NBA Defensive Player of the Year, while Danny Ainge, who executed "the most dramatic NBA turnaround ever", was named NBA Executive of the Year. The Celtics also sold out all 41 regular-season home games.

Their two-year absence from the playoffs came to an end as they met the Atlanta Hawks in the first round of the 2008 NBA Playoffs. Eventually, they advanced to the NBA Finals for the first time in 21 years, where they met the Los Angeles Lakers. The Celtics won 4–2, capturing their first championship since 1986, and 17th all-time. However, they had a far difficult path to this championship, playing 26 games, the most any team had ever played in a post-season

2007–08 Boston Celtics season
Head coach Doc Rivers
Owner(s) Wycliffe Grousbeck
Stephen Pagliuca
H. Irving Grousbeck
Arena TD Banknorth Garden
Results
Record 66–16 (.805)
Place Division: 1st (Atlantic)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
(won 4–2)
Local media
Television CSN New England
Radio WEEI

NBA Draft 2007: The Ray Allen trade

Shortly after being traded to the Celtics, Ray Allen threw out the first pitch for a baseball game at Fenway Park, home of the Boston Red Sox of Major League Baseball.

On May 22, the Celtics were assigned the 5th overall selection in the NBA Draft Lottery, essentially losing their chance of drafting either Greg Oden or Kevin Durant, who both were considered to go 1st and 2nd in the Draft. The 5th pick was the worst-case scenario for the Celtics, who had a 19.9% chance of obtaining the 1st overall selection. However, on June 28, the day of the 2007 NBA Draft, the Celtics traded the 5th pick along with Wally Szczerbiak and Delonte West to the Seattle SuperSonics in exchange for All-Star 3-point specialist Ray Allen and the 35th overall selection prior to the event, and with the 5th pick selected forward Jeff Green for Seattle. In the second round of the Draft, the Celtics selected guard Gabe Pruitt with the 32nd pick, which was their own, and forward Glen "Big Baby" Davis with the 35th pick, previously obtained from Seattle.

Kevin Garnett trade
The Celtics achieved the league's top record with the acquisition of Kevin Garnett, who carried the team throughout the season and was amongst the leaders for the Most Valuable Player award.

On July 31, the Celtics traded for 10-time All-Star and 2004 MVP Kevin Garnett in the single largest trade for one player in NBA history. He was acquired from the Minnesota Timberwolves in exchange for Al Jefferson, Ryan Gomes, Theo Ratliff, Gerald Green, Sebastian Telfair, Boston's 2009 first-round draft pick (top three protected), the return of Minnesota's conditional first-round draft pick previously obtained in the 2006 Ricky Davis-Wally Szczerbiak trade and cash considerations. By adding Garnett to All-Stars Paul Pierce and Ray Allen, the trade brought a new era of relevance to the long-struggling franchise, but it also left the roster short-handed.

Free agency

The Garnett trade left the roster depleted and depth became an immediate concern. Eventually, the Celtics signed guards Eddie House and Jackie Manuel on August 1, just two days after the Garnett trade, and center Scot Pollard on August 9. Later, Ainge called and asked 5-time All-Star Reggie Miller to return from his 2-year retirement and join the roster in a reserve role. Miller strongly considered the possibility of playing alongside Garnett, but ultimately announced on August 23 that he would not join the Celtics. On August 27, forward James Posey signed with the team and was considered a decisive signing which instantly gave the Celtics a drastic improvement to their bench.

On September 26, center Esteban Batista and guard Dahntay Jones signed non-guaranteed contracts with the Celtics, two days before the beginning of training camp and the team's departure to Rome for the 2007 NBA Europe Live Tour. Curiously, Jones was involved in a trade back in the 2003 NBA Draft, in which the Celtics drafted him with the 20th overall selection, but immediately traded him with the 16th pick, Troy Bell, to the Memphis Grizzlies in exchange for the 13th pick, Marcus Banks, and the 27th pick, Kendrick Perkins. Ultimately, the Celtics waived Batista on October 16, and Manuel and Jones on October 25, bringing the roster down to 14 players, one shy of the league maximum of 15 players, in order to have roster flexibility and be able to sign another player midway through the season.

Later in the season, on December 18, the Celtics released yet another player, Brandon Wallace, in order to have even more roster flexibility that coach Doc Rivers said they needed. This move brought the roster down to only 13 players, which is the league minimum for players allowed on a team's roster. On February 27, the Celtics signed center P.J. Brown for the remainder of the season, in order to bolster their front court. His decision to come to Boston was strongly aided by a conversation with future teammates Ray Allen and Paul Pierce, who convinced him to sign with the Celtics during the 2008 NBA All-Star Weekend. On March 4, 2008, the Celtics officially announced that they had signed guard Sam Cassell. After the signing, Cassell immediately flew back to his hometown of Baltimore to attend funeral services for a deceased family member. This signing ultimately put the roster up to the league maximum of 15 players.

Players Coaches
Pos. # Name Height Weight DOB (Y–M–D) From
SG 20 Allen, Ray 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) 205 lb (93 kg) 1975-07-20 Connecticut
SG 42 Allen, Tony 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) 213 lb (97 kg) 1982-01-11 Oklahoma State
C 93 Brown, P.J. 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 239 lb (108 kg) 1969-10-14 Louisiana Tech
PG 28 Cassell, Sam 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 185 lb (84 kg) 1969-11-18 Florida State
PF 11 Davis, Glen 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 289 lb (131 kg) 1986-01-1 LSU
PF 5 Garnett, Kevin 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 220 lb (100 kg) 1976-05-19 Farragut
PG 50 House, Eddie 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 175 lb (79 kg) 1978-05-14 Arizona State
C 43 Perkins, Kendrick 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 264 lb (120 kg) 1984-11-10 CJOHS
SF 34 Pierce, Paul (C) 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 235 lb (107 kg) 1977-10-13 Kansas
C 66 Pollard, Scot Injured 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 278 lb (126 kg) 1975-02-12 Kansas
SF 41 Posey, James 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 217 lb (98 kg) 1977-01-13 Xavier
PF 0 Powe, Leon 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 240 lb (109 kg) 1984-01-22 California
PG 13 Pruitt, Gabe 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) 170 lb (77 kg) 1986-04-19 Southern California
PG 9 Rondo, Rajon 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 171 lb (78 kg) 1986-02-22 Kentucky
PF 44 Scalabrine, Brian 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 235 lb (107 kg) 1978/03/18 Southern California


Head coach

Doc Rivers (Marquette)

Assistant coach(es)

Armond Hill (Princeton)
Kevin Eastman (Richmond)
Clifford Ray (Oklahoma)
Tom Thibodeau (Salem State)

Tuesday, April 10, 2012

2001-02 Los Angeles Lakers

The highlight of the Los Angeles Lakers season was winning the 2002 NBA Finals thus completing the first three-peat in franchise history.

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Shaquille O'Neal Jelani McCoy
PF Robert Horry Samaki Walker Mark Madsen
Stanislav Medvedenko
SF Rick Fox Devean George
SG Kobe Bryant Brian Shaw Mitch Richmond
PG Derek Fisher Lindsey Hunter

Player GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
Kobe Bryant 80 80 38.3 .469 .250 .829 5.5 5.5 1.48 .44 25.2
Derek Fisher 70 35 28.2 .411 .413 .847 2.1 2.6 .94 .13 11.2
Rick Fox 82 82 27.9 .421 .313 .824 4.7 3.5 .82 .26 7.9
Devean George 82 1 21.5 .411 .371 .675 3.7 1.4 .87 .51 7.1
Robert Horry 81 23 26.4 .398 .374 .783 5.9 2.9 .95 1.10 6.8
Lindsey Hunter 82 47 19.7 .382 .380 .500 1.5 1.6 .80 .23 5.8
Mark Madsen 59 5 11.0 .452 .000 .648 2.7 .7 .27 .22 2.8
Jelani McCoy 21 0 5.0 .571 .000 .250 1.2 .3 .00 .24 1.2
Slava Medvedenko 71 6 10.3 .477 .000 .661 2.2 .6 .41 .15 4.7
Shaquille O'Neal 67 66 36.1 .579 .000 .555 10.7 3.0 .61 2.04 27.2
Mike Penberthy 3 0 4.0 .500 .000 .750 .7 .7 .67 .00 1.7
Mitch Richmond 64 2 11.1 .405 .290 .955 1.5 .9 .28 .09 4.1
Brian Shaw 58 0 10.9 .353 .330 .692 1.9 1.5 .43 .05 2.9
Samaki Walker 69 63 24.0 .512 .000 .667 7.0 .9 .41 1.28 6.7

2001–02 Los Angeles Lakers season
Fourteenth NBA Championship
Head coach Phil Jackson
Owner(s) Jerry Buss
Arena Staples Center
Results
Record 58–24 (.707)
Place Division: 2nd (Pacific)
Conference: 2nd (Western)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Stats @ Basketball-Reference.com
Local media
Television Fox Sports Net West, KCAL
Radio AM 570 KLAC

Monday, April 9, 2012

1966-67 Philadelphia 76ers

The 1966-67 season of the Philadelphia 76ers was their 14th season in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and their fourth since moving from Syracuse. The season would set a record in winning percentage and they won the NBA Finals for their second championship. The team was later chosen as the greatest individual team in 1980 for the NBA 35th Anniversary Team.

During the off-season, the 76ers dismissed coach Dolph Schayes of Syracuse National fame. Alex Hannum, the former 1950s power forward, who was the last man to coach a winner past Boston, was the new coach. The 43-year-old Hannum looked like he could still play, and often ran with the club in practice.

Hannum's 76ers would share the ball, or play 'Celtic-ball' as some observed. Wilt Chamberlain would not be expected to hold the team afloat like Atlas but would pass more and get the others involved. His eight assists per game set a record for centers and made him third in the NBA overall, while scoring 24 per game and again leading the NBA in rebounds and blocked shots.

Shooting less, he made a league-record 68% of his shots; his 875 free throw attempts, another league record, offset his dismal percentage from the foul line.

The 76ers also had three other players around the 20 point-per-game mark this season in Hal Greer with 22 points, Chet Walker and Billy Cunningham, both with 19 points. All four players combined won a league-record 68 games together under Hannum's watch. The team averaged a record 125 points per game, leading all teams in shooting accuracy.

The 76ers started the season at 46–4, still the best 50-game start in league history. They finished the season at 68–13, the best record in league history at the time.

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Wilt Chamberlain
PF Luke Jackson Billy Cunningham
SF Chet Walker Dave Gambee
SG Hal Greer Matt Guokas
PG Wali Jones Larry Costello Bill Melchionni Bob Weiss

1966–67 Philadelphia 76ers season
Second NBA Championship
Head coach Alex Hannum
Arena Philadelphia Arena and Civic Center-Convention Hall
Results
Record 68–13 (.840)
Place Division: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Stats @ Basketball-Reference.com
Local media
Television WFIL-TV
Radio WFIL Radio

Tuesday, April 3, 2012

1978–79 Indiana State Sycamores men's basketball

The 1978–79 Indiana State Sycamores men's basketball team is considered the greatest in the school's history. The Sycamores were undefeated in the regular season and were led by Larry Bird. He led an undefeated team to the national title game versus a Magic Johnson-led Michigan State team, and ended the season as National Runner-Up with a record of 33–1.

1978–79 Indiana State Sycamores men's basketball
Missouri Valley Conference champions
NCAA Men's Division I Tournament, Finalist
Conference Missouri Valley Conference
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #1
1978–79 record 33–1 (16–0 MVC)
Head coach Bill Hodges
Home arena Hulman Center

In 1979, the NCAA tournament championship game was the most-watched game in the history of the sport, in no small part because of Indiana state star Larry Bird. Bird wasn’t a one-man show, but the unheralded Sycamores rode him to a 33-0 record heading into the title game. The well-rounded Bird averaged 29 points, 14.8 rebounds, and, most significantly, six assists as he changed the way the game was played. Head coach Bob King suffered a stroke and was unable to continue as head coach of the Sycamores. Assistant Bill Hodges was elevated to the position of head coach. On November 20, the touring Soviet National team came to Hulman Center to play Indiana State. ISU defeated the Soviets, 83–79, to become one of only four college teams to beat them that season.

During the 1978–79 season, Indiana State qualified for the NCAA Tournament. ISU finished the regular season to finish 29–0, 16–0 in the Missouri Valley Conference, and earned the top ranking in the country.

The only time that the perfect regular season was in jeopardy was on Feb. 1. The Sycamores were 18–0 against New Mexico State. With three seconds remaining, the Sycamores were down 83–81. New Mexico State was at the free throw line and the shot was missed. The missed shot was rebounded by Brad Miley and passed to Bob Heaton. Heaton launched a 50-foot desperation shot which banked through the net to send the game into overtime.

Bird received several honors at the end of regular season. He won the USBWA College Player of the Year, Naismith and Wooden Awards, given to the year's top male college basketball player.

The Sycamores were led by Bird, the NCAA Player of the Year, and his 28.6 scoring average. He was followed by Carl Nicks’ 19.3 average. The starting lineup also included Miley, Alex Gilbert and Steve Reed. Heaton and Leroy Staley were key reserves. The remainder of the roster consisted of Tom Crowder, Eric Curry, Rod McNelly, Rich Nemcek, Bob Ritter and Scott Turner.

* 5 Bob Ritter
* 10 Scott Turner
* 15 Dave McNally
* 20 Rich Nemcek
* 22 Carl Nicks
* 23 Steve Reed
* 24 Tom Crowder
* 30 Bob Heaton
* 32 Eric Curry
* 33 Larry Bird
* 40 Brad Miley
* 42 Alex Gilbert
* 44 Leroy Staley

The top seed in the NCAA Midwest Regional was awarded to the Sycamores. The final game of the regional tournament was against Arkansas with a berth in the Final Four on the line. With the game tied at 81, the right-handed Heaton was the hero again with a last second left-handed shot in the lane to win the game. They advanced to the championship game and faced Michigan State University, which was led by sophomore Magic Johnson. In what was the most-watched college basketball game ever,[4] Michigan State defeated Indiana State 75–64, and Johnson was voted Most Outstanding Player of the Final Four.

* West
o Indiana State (#1 seed) 86, Virginia Tech (#8 seed) 69
o Indiana State 93, Oklahoma (#5 seed) 72
o Indiana State 73, Arkansas (#2 seed) 71

* Final Four
o Indiana State 76, DePaul 74
o Michigan State 75, Indiana State 64

# Larry Bird, Consensus All-American teams
# Larry Bird, All-Missouri Valley Conference
# Larry Bird – AP, UPI, USBWA, The Sporting News, Basketball Weekly All-American selections
# Larry Bird, Missouri Valley Conference Most Valuable Player
# Larry Bird – 1979 Oscar Robertson Trophy, Naismith Award, John R. Wooden Award, Adolph Rupp Trophy, Eastman Award
# Bill Hodges, NCAA Coach of the Year

Monday, April 2, 2012

1990–91 UNLV Runnin' Rebels basketball team

The 1990–91 UNLV Runnin' Rebels basketball team represented the University of Nevada, Las Vegas in NCAA Division I men's competition in the 1990–91 season. The Runnin' Rebels, coached by Jerry Tarkanian, entered the season as defending national champions and entered the 1991 NCAA tournament unbeaten, but lost in the national semifinal to eventual champions Duke.

The team played its home games in the Thomas & Mack Center, and was a member of the Big West Conference; it would join the Western Athletic Conference in 1996 and become a charter member of its current conference, the Mountain West Conference, in 1999.

The nickname "Runnin' Rebels" is unique to men's basketball at UNLV. The default nickname for men's sports teams at the school is simply "Rebels", while all women's teams are known as "Lady Rebels".

Larry Johnson, Naismith College Player of the Year
Larry Johnson, USBWA College Player of the Year
Larry Johnson, John R. Wooden Award

Year Round Pick Player NBA Club
1991 1 1 Larry Johnson Charlotte Hornets
1991 1 9 Stacey Augmon Atlanta Hawks
1991 1 12 Greg Anthony New York Knicks
1991 2 29 George Ackles New York Knicks
1992 1 25 Elmore Spencer Los Angeles Clippers

1990–91 UNLV Runnin' Rebels men's basketball
NCAA Men's Division I Tournament, Final Four
Conference Big West Conference
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #1
1990–91 record 34–1 (18–0 Big West)
Head coach Jerry Tarkanian
Home arena Thomas and Mack Center