Wednesday, February 29, 2012

1984 Liverpool FC

Liverpool were already the Kings of English Football when they won a treble in 1984. They took home the League Title (their 15th title and third consecutive championship), League Cup (their fourth straight title), and European Cup (their fourth title). The only blight on their resume that year was a loss to Brighton & Hove Albion F.C. in the F.A. Cup.

The 1984 European Cup Final was an association football match between Liverpool of England and Roma of Italy on 30 May 1984 at the Stadio Olimpico, Rome, Italy. It was the final match of the 1983–84 season of Europe's premier cup competition, the European Cup. Liverpool were appearing in their fourth final, they had won the competition three times in 1977, 1978 and 1981. Roma were appearing in their first European Cup final.

Each club needed to progress through four rounds to reach the final. Matches were contested over two legs, with a match at each team's home ground. Liverpool's matches ties ranged from close affairs to comfortable victories. They beat Athletic Bilbao by a single goal in the second round, while they beat Benfica 5–1 on aggregate in the quarter-finals. Roma's matches were all close affairs,winning their ties up to the semi-final by two goal margins. They beat Dundee United 3–2 on aggregate in the semi-finals, although it was later revealed that Roma attempted to bribe the referee in the second leg of the semi-final.

As the final was held at Roma's home ground they went into the match as favourites, despite Liverpool's previous record in the competition. Watched by a crowd of 69,693, Liverpool took the lead in the first half when Phil Neal scored. Roma equalised when Roberto Pruzzo scored before half-time. With the score 1–1 through full-time and extra-time, the match went to a penalty shootout. Liverpool won the shootout 4–2 to win their fourth European Cup.

Colorful goalkeeper Bruce Grobbelaar was the hero of the European Cup Final, coming up big in the penalty shootout during which time he gained lifelong infamy for mockingly wobbling his legs in horror and pretending to eat spaghetti at Roma’s kick takers. On defense, Liverpool boasted the likes of right back Phil Neal, who was the only Liverpool player to appear in their first 5 European Cup Finals (winning four of them), and left-back Alan Kennedy, who converted the winning penalty kick against Roma in the European Cup Finals. Skipper Graeme Souness was joined in the midfield by Craig Johnston, Sammy Lee, and Ronnie Whelan, all of whom played important roles in securing the treble. Up front, Liverpool legend Kenny Dalglish formed a dangerous partnership with reigning PFA Young Player of the Year, Ian Rush. Liverpool followed up their success with another League Title the following season, running their record tally in that category to 16.

Liverpool gained entry to the competition by winning the 1982–83 Football League, entering as English champions. Their opponents in the first round were Danish champions Odense. The first leg in Denmark at the Odense Stadium was won 1–0 by Liverpool. A 5–0 victory in the second leg at their home ground Anfield ensured they won the tie 6–0 on aggregate.

In the second round Liverpool were drawn against Spanish champions Athletic Bilbao. The first leg in England ended 0–0, but Liverpool won the second leg at the San Mamés Stadium 1–0 courtesy of an Ian Rush goal to win the tie 1–0 on aggregate. Liverpool's opponents in the quarter-finals were Portuguese champions Benfica. Liverpool won the first leg in England 1–0 after another Rush goal. The second leg at the Estádio da Luz in Portugal rseulted in a comprehensive 4–1 victory for Liverpool. Thus, they won the tie 5–1 on aggregate.

In the semi-final, Liverpool's opponents were Romanian champions Dinamo București. An ill-tempered first leg, which saw Liverpool captain Graeme Souness break the jaw of one the Dinamo players, was won 1–0 by Liverpool. The second leg at the Stadionul Dinamo was won 2–1 by Liverpool after two goals from Rush. Liverpool won the tie 3–1 on aggregate to progress to their fourth European Cup final.

LIVERPOOL:

GK 1 Zimbabwe Bruce Grobbelaar
RB 2 England Phil Neal Booked in the 32nd minute 32'
LB 3 England Alan Kennedy
CB 4 Republic of Ireland Mark Lawrenson
LM 5 Republic of Ireland Ronnie Whelan
CB 6 Scotland Alan Hansen
SS 7 Scotland Kenny Dalglish Substituted off in the 94th minute 94'
RM 8 England Sammy Lee
CF 9 Wales Ian Rush
CM 10 England Craig Johnston Substituted off in the 72nd minute 72'
CM 11 Scotland Graeme Souness (c)
Substitutes:
FW 12 Republic of Ireland Michael Robinson Substituted on in the 94th minute 94'
Gk 13 England Bob Bolder
DF 14 Scotland Steve Nicol Substituted on in the 72nd minute 72'
FW 15 England David Hodgson
DF 16 Scotland Gary Gillespie
Manager:
England Joe Fagan

1974–75 UCLA Bruins Men's Basketball Team

In head coach John R. Wooden's final game, the 1974–75 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won the team's tenth National Championship in twelve years over the Kentucky Wildcats (92–85), in the San Diego Sports Arena, San Diego, California.

The Bruins defeated Michigan in the first round. In the West Regional, UCLA beat Montana and Arizona State to advance to the Final Four. Washington scored 26 points to give UCLA an overtime victory over Louisville, 75–74, in the semi-finals game. After the game, Coach Wooden announced that the championship game would be his last game.

This UCLA team was far from the most talented coashed by the legendary John Wooden. It was a team without superstars, in fact, but it turned out to be one of wooden’s favorites, for it sent him into retirement with a 92-85 victory over Kentucky in the 1975 national title game behind center Richard Washington’s 28 points. The championship was Wooden’s 10th, a record that may never be broken.

1974–75 UCLA Bruins men's basketball
Pacific-8 Conference title
Maryland Invitational Championship
NCAA National Championship Game
vs. Kentucky, W, 92–85
Conference Pacific-8 Conference
Ranking
Coaches #2
AP #1
1974–75 record 28–3 (12–2 Pac-8)
Head coach John R. Wooden
Assistant coach Gary Cunningham
Home arena Pauley Pavilion

# David Byrum
# Casey Corlisss
# Ralph Drollinger
# Marques Johnson
# Andre McCarter
# Dave Meyers
# Wilbert Olinde
# Gavin Smith
# Jim Spillane
# Marvin Thomas
# Raymond Townsend
# Pete Trgovich
# Brett Vroman
# Richard Washington

1997 Florida Marlins

The 1997 Florida Marlins season started off with the team trying to improve on their record from 1996. Their manager was Jim Leyland. They played home games at Pro Player Stadium. They finished with a record of 92-70, winning the NL Wild Card got through the National League playoffs and won the World Series over the Cleveland Indians.

1997 Florida Marlins
Roster
Pitchers

* 57 Antonio Alfonseca
* 27 Kevin Brown
* 42 Dennis Cook
* 32 Alex Fernandez
* 33 Rick Helling
* 49 Félix Heredia
* 61 Liván Hernández
* 52 Mark Hutton
* 25 Al Leiter
* 35 Kurt Miller
* 31 Robb Nen
* 33 Kirt Ojala
* 46 Donn Pall
* 39 Jay Powell
* 48 Pat Rapp
* 41 Tony Saunders
* 38 Rob Stanifer
* 52 Ed Vosberg
* 30 Matt Whisenant

Catchers
* 23 Charles Johnson
* 13 Bob Natal
* 9 Gregg Zaun

Infielders
* 7 Kurt Abbott
* 26 Alex Arias
* 24 Bobby Bonilla
* 2 Josh Booty
* 1 Luis Castillo
* 19 Jeff Conine
* 30 Craig Counsell
* 20 Darren Daulton
* 21 Ralph Milliard
* 16,3 Edgar Rentería

Outfielders
* 18 Moisés Alou
* 28 John Cangelosi
* 17 Todd Dunwoody
* 8 Jim Eisenreich
* 15 Cliff Floyd
* 4 Mark Kotsay
* 40 Billy McMillon
* 43 Russ Morman
* 10 Gary Sheffield
* 14 John Wehner
* 22 Devon White

Manager
* 11 Jim Leyland

Coaches
* 45 Rich Donnelly (3rd Base)
* 12 Bruce Kimm (Bullpen)
* 6 Jerry Manuel (Bench)
* 29 Milt May (Hitting)
* 47 Larry Rothschild (Pitching)
* 37 Tommy Sandt (1st Base)

1978 New York Yankees

The 1978 New York Yankees season was the 76th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a record of 100-63, finishing one game ahead of the Boston Red Sox to win their third American League East title. The two teams were tied after 162 games, leading to a one-game playoff, which the Yankees won.

In the ALCS, they defeated the Kansas City Royals in 4 games. In the World Series, they defeated the Los Angeles Dodgers in 6 games in a rematch of the 1977 World Series. New York was managed by Billy Martin, Dick Howser and Bob Lemon. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1978 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers

* 45 Jim Beattie
* 43 Ken Clay
* 53 Ron Davis
* 36 Rawly Eastwick
* 31 Ed Figueroa
* 54 Goose Gossage
* 49 Ron Guidry
* 35 Don Gullett
* 53 Ken Holtzman
* 29 Catfish Hunter
* 40 Bob Kammeyer
* 36 Paul Lindblad
* 28 Sparky Lyle
* 40,53 Larry McCall
* 47 Andy Messersmith
* 52 Dave Rajsich
* 19 Dick Tidrow

Catchers
* 40 Fran Healy
* 46 Mike Heath
* 41 Cliff Johnson
* 15 Thurman Munson

Infielders
* 10 Chris Chambliss
* 20 Bucky Dent
* 25 Brian Doyle
* 23 Dámaso García
* 24 Mickey Klutts
* 9 Graig Nettles
* 26 Domingo Ramos
* 30 Willie Randolph
* 18 Dennis Sherrill
* 11 Fred Stanley
* 25 George Zeber

Outfielders
* 2 Paul Blair
* 44 Reggie Jackson
* 27 Jay Johnstone
* 14 Lou Piniella
* 17 Mickey Rivers
* 12 Jim Spencer
* 24 Gary Thomasson
* 6 Roy White

Other batters

* 27 Dell Alston

Manager
* 1 Billy Martin
* 34 Dick Howser
* 21 Bob Lemon

Coaches
* 8 Yogi Berra
* 42 Art Fowler (pitching)
* 32 Elston Howard (first base)
* 34 Dick Howser (third base)
* 48 Clyde King
* 33 Gene Michael

Tuesday, February 28, 2012

1984 France National Team

The 1984 UEFA European Football Championship final tournament was held in France. West Germany also bid for the hosting of this event. It was the seventh European Football Championship, held every four years and endorsed by UEFA. The final tournament took place from 12 to 27 June 1984.

At the time, only eight countries took part in the final stage of the tournament, seven of which had to come through the qualifying stage. France qualified automatically as hosts of the event; led by Michel Platini, who scored nine goals in France's five matches, Les Bleus won the tournament – their first major international title.

Les Bleus exploded onto the scene in 1982, going all the way to the Semi-Finals of the World Cup before losing to West Germany on penalty kicks. Expectations for France were high for Euro 1984, which they happened to host. France did not disappoint, winning all of its matches en route to a 2-0 defeat of Spain in the Finals to win the country’s first international title. France followed up their victory with a 3rd place finish at the 1986 World Cup, losing to West Germany once again. Midfielder Michel Platini was the star of the tournament, scoring 9 goals in the competition, including two consecutive hat-tricks in the group stage. He was joined by Jean Tigana, Luis Fernandez and Alain Giresse to form the Magic Square (le Carre Magique), one of the best midfield foursomes in soccer history. Les Bleus also boasted a great goal-keeper in Joel Bats, and stalwart defenders including Patrick Battiston, who recovered from a career-threatening injury against West Germany in the 1982 World Cup Semi-Finals to play an important role for Euro 1984.

France were the favourites of English bookmakers to win the tournament with odds of 5/8. Expectations at home were sky-high following the side's brilliant display and fourth-place finish at the 1982 World Cup. Les Bleus of 1984 seemed even stronger, having remedied many of the weaknesses that had dogged them at the World Cup. In Joël Bats, France had found at long last a first-class goalkeeper. The shaky dual-sweeper central defence of 1982 has made way for a rock-solid conventional setup around centre-back Yvon Le Roux and sweeper Patrick Battiston. The midfield, where gritty defensive upstart Luis Fernández had joined 1982 veterans Jean Tigana, Alain Giresse, and Michel Platini in the so-called carré magique ("magic square"), was arguably the best in the world. In offense, manager Michel Hidalgo had worked around the lack of a world-class striker by designing a flexible 4–4–2 system that enabled Platini, then at the zenith of his footballing abilities, to switch from playmaker to centre-forward at short notice. The only major unknown was how the team would fare under the pressure of competition, as it had been exempted from the qualifying round as the host nation.

FRANCE:

GK 1 Joël Bats
DF 5 Patrick Battiston Substituted off in the 73rd minute 73'
DF 4 Maxime Bossis
DF 15 Yvon Le Roux
DF 3 Jean-François Domergue
MF 14 Jean Tigana
MF 6 Luis Fernández
MF 10 Michel Platini
MF 12 Alain Giresse
FW 17 Bernard Lacombe Substituted off in the 80th minute 80'
FW 11 Bruno Bellone
Substitutions:
DF 2 Manuel Amoros Substituted on in the 73rd minute 73'
FW 9 Bernard Genghini Substituted on in the 80th minute 80'
Manager:
France Michel Hidalgo

1998 New York Yankees

The New York Yankees' 1998 season was the 96th season for the Yankees. The team finished with a franchise record regular-season standing of 114-48, 22 games ahead of the second-place Boston Red Sox in the American League East. These Yankees set an American League record for wins in a season, a record that would stand until 2001, when the Seattle Mariners won 116 games in the regular season against 46 losses. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

In the postseason, they swept the Texas Rangers in the American League Division Series, won the American League pennant by beating the Cleveland Indians four games to two in the American League Championship Series, and swept the San Diego Padres to capture their unprecedented 24th World Series. Including the playoffs, the 1998 Yankees won a total of 125 games against 50 losses, an MLB record. They are widely considered to be one of the greatest teams in baseball history. The 125 games (regular season and playoffs combined) was the most by a championship team, surpassing the previous record of 116, set by their cross-town rivals, New York Mets in 1986.

1998 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers

* 13 Willie Banks
* 57 Joe Borowski
* 59 Ryan Bradley
* 61 Jim Bruske
* 52 Mike Buddie
* 36 David Cone
* 54 Todd Erdos
* 26 Orlando Hernández
* 40 Darren Holmes
* 35 Hideki Irabu
* 58 Mike Jerzembeck
* 27 Graeme Lloyd
* 55 Ramiro Mendoza
* 43 Jeff Nelson
* 46 Andy Pettitte
* 42 Mariano Rivera
* 29 Mike Stanton
* 62 Jay Tessmer
* 33 David Wells

Catchers
* 13 Mike Figga
* 25 Joe Girardi
* 20 Jorge Posada

Infielders
* 18 Scott Brosius
* 22 Homer Bush
* 2 Derek Jeter
* 11 Chuck Knoblauch
* 60 Mike Lowell
* 24 Tino Martinez
* 19 Luis Sojo
* 17 Dale Sveum

Outfielders
* 28 Chad Curtis
* 38 Ricky Ledee
* 21 Paul O'Neill
* 31 Tim Raines
* 47 Shane Spencer
* 39 Darryl Strawberry
* 51 Bernie Williams

Other batters
* 45 Chili Davis

Manager
* 6 Joe Torre

Coaches

* 53 José Cardenal (First Base)
* 48 Chris Chambliss (Hitting)
* 40 Tony Cloninger (Bullpen)
* 30 Willie Randolph (Third Base)
* 34 Mel Stottlemyre (Pitching)
* 50 Don Zimmer (Bench)

1979 Baltimore Orioles

The 1979 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. The Orioles finished first in the American League East division of Major League Baseball with a record of 102 wins and 57 losses. They went on to defeat the California Angels in the 1979 American League Championship Series, 3 games to 1, before losing in the 1979 World Series to the Pittsburgh Pirates, 4 games to 3.

1979 Baltimore Orioles
Roster
Pitchers

* 46 Mike Flanagan
* 37 John Flinn
* 59 Dave Ford
* 30 Dennis Martínez
* 23 Tippy Martinez
* 16 Scott McGregor
* 22 Jim Palmer
* 43 Jeff Rineer
* 26 Don Stanhouse
* 53 Sammy Stewart
* 49 Tim Stoddard
* 21,32 Steve Stone

Catchers
* 24 Rick Dempsey
* 44 Elrod Hendricks
* 8 Dave Skaggs

Infielders
* 7 Mark Belanger
* 45 Tom Chism
* 10 Terry Crowley
* 25 Rich Dauer
* 11 Doug DeCinces
* 3 Kiko Garcia
* 12 Wayne Krenchicki
* 14 Lee May
* 33 Eddie Murray
* 2 Billy Smith

Outfielders
* 27 Benny Ayala
* 1 Al Bumbry
* 15 Mark Corey
* 6 Larry Harlow
* 18 Pat Kelly
* 38 John Lowenstein
* 9 Bob Molinaro
* 35 Gary Roenicke
* 29 Ken Singleton

Manager
* 4 Earl Weaver

Coaches

* 41 Jim Frey
* 44 Elrod Hendricks
* 31 Ray Miller
* 47 Cal Ripken
* 20 Frank Robinson

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Rick Dempsey 124 368 88 .239 6 41
1B Eddie Murray 159 606 179 .295 25 99
2B Rich Dauer 142 479 123 .257 9 61
3B Doug DeCinces 120 422 97 .230 16 61
SS Kiko Garcia 126 417 103 .247 5 24
LF Gary Roenicke 133 376 98 .261 25 64
CF Al Bumbry 148 569 162 .285 7 49
RF Ken Singleton 159 570 168 .295 35 111
DH Lee May 124 456 116 .254 19 69

Monday, February 27, 2012

1999 New York Yankees

The New York Yankees' 1999 season was the 97th season for the Bronx based professional baseball team. The team finished with a record of 98-64 finishing 4 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium. In the playoffs, they got to the World Series and ended up beating the Atlanta Braves in 4 games to win their 25th World Series title.

1999 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers

* 41 Mike Buddie
* 12,22 Roger Clemens
* 36 David Cone
* 54 Todd Erdos
* 27 Tony Fossas
* 38 Jason Grimsley
* 26 Orlando Hernández
* 14 Hideki Irabu
* 57 Jeff Juden
* 55 Ramiro Mendoza
* 31 Dan Naulty
* 43 Jeff Nelson
* 46 Andy Pettitte
* 42 Mariano Rivera
* 29 Mike Stanton
* 57 Jay Tessmer
* 27 Allen Watson
* 52 Ed Yarnall

Catchers
* 13 Mike Figga
* 25 Joe Girardi
* 20 Jorge Posada

Infielders
* 35 Clay Bellinger
* 18 Scott Brosius
* 2 Derek Jeter
* 59 D'Angelo Jiménez
* 11 Chuck Knoblauch
* 12 Jim Leyritz
* 13 Jeff Manto
* 24 Tino Martinez
* 19 Luis Sojo
* 58 Alfonso Soriano

Outfielders
* 28 Chad Curtis
* 17 Ricky Ledee
* 21 Paul O'Neill
* 47 Shane Spencer
* 22 Tony Tarasco
* 51 Bernie Williams

Other batters
* 45 Chili Davis
* 39 Darryl Strawberry

Manager
* 6 Joe Torre

Coaches
* 53 José Cardenal (First Base)
* 48 Chris Chambliss (Hitting)
* 40 Tony Cloninger (Bullpen)
* 30 Willie Randolph (Third Base)
* 34 Mel Stottlemyre (Pitching)
* 50 Don Zimmer (Bench)

1979 Pittsburgh Pirates

The 1979 Pittsburgh Pirates had 98 wins and 64 losses and captured the National League East Division title by two games over the Montreal Expos. The Pirates beat the Cincinnati Reds to win their ninth National League title, and the Baltimore Orioles to win their fifth World Series title - and also their last playoff series victory to date. The wildly popular disco hit "We Are Family" by Sister Sledge was used as the team's theme song that season.

Opening Day lineup

1. SS Frank Taveras
2. CF Omar Moreno
3. RF Dave Parker
4. 1B Willie Stargell
5. LF Bill Robinson
6. 2B Rennie Stennett
7. C Ed Ott
8. 3B Phil Garner
9. P Bert Blyleven

1979 Pittsburgh Pirates
Roster
Pitchers

* 26 Jim Bibby
* 22 Bert Blyleven
* 45 John Candelaria
* 41 Joe Coleman
* 17 Dock Ellis
* 23 Grant Jackson
* 25 Bruce Kison
* 44 Rick Rhoden
* 49 Dave Roberts
* 43 Don Robinson
* 15 Enrique Romo
* 19 Jim Rooker
* 27 Kent Tekulve
* 31 Ed Whitson

Catchers
* 16 Steve Nicosia
* 14 Ed Ott
* 35 Manny Sanguillén

Infielders
* 4 Dale Berra
* 10 Tim Foli
* 3 Phil Garner
* 5 Bill Madlock
* 8 Willie Stargell
* 6 Rennie Stennett
* 10 Frank Taveras

Outfielders
* 36 Matt Alexander
* 24 Mike Easler
* 17 Lee Lacy
* 34 John Milner
* 18 Omar Moreno
* 39 Dave Parker
* 28 Bill Robinson

Other batters
* 44 Doe Boyland
* 2 Gary Hargis
* 37 Alberto Lois

Manager
* 7 Chuck Tanner

Coaches

* 57 Harvey Haddix (pitching)
* 32 Joe Lonnett (third base)
* 42 Al Monchak (first base)
* 48 Bob Skinner (hitting)

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Ed Ott 117 403 110 .273 7 51
1B Willie Stargell 126 424 119 .281 32 82
2B Rennie Stennett 108 319 76 .289 0 24
3B Bill Madlock 85 311 102 .328 7 44
SS Tim Foli 133 525 153 .291 1 65
LF Bill Robinson 148 421 111 .264 24 75
CF Omar Moreno 162 695 196 .282 8 69
RF Dave Parker 158 622 193 .310 25 94

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Bert Blyleven 37 237.1 12 5 3.60 172
John Candelaria 33 207.0 14 9 3.22 101
Bruce Kison 33 172.1 13 7 3.19 105
Don Robinson 29 160.2 8 8 3.87 96
Jim Rooker 19 103.2 4 7 4.60 44
Rick Rhoden 1 5 0 1 7.20 2

Sunday, February 26, 2012

1998 France World Cup Team

The 1998 FIFA World Cup was the 16th FIFA World Cup, the world championship for men's national ssociation football teams. It was held in France from 10 June to 12 July 1998. The country was chosen as the host nation by FIFA for the second time in the history of the tournament, defeating Morocco in the bidding process. The tournament was won by France, who beat Brazil 3-0 in the final. France won their first title, becoming the seventh nation to win a World Cup, and the sixth (after Uruguay, Italy, England, West Germany and Argentina) to win the tournament on home soil.

The 1998 FIFA World Cup Final was a football match that was played on 12 July 1998 at the Stade de France in St-Denis to determine the winner of the 1998 FIFA World Cup a global football tournament held every four years. The final was contested by Brazil, who were the defending champions having won the FIFA World Cup four years earlier in 1994, and the host nation France, who had reached the final of the tournament for the first time. France won the match 3–0 to claim the World Cup for the first time, with the timing of the match two days before Bastille Day adding to the significance of the victory. Zinedine Zidane, who was named man of the match, scored twice before half-time and Emmanuel Petit added a third goal in the last minute. The match had an attendance in the region of 75,000.

Both sides had suffered mixed fortunes on the route to the final. Brazil made it out of the group stage with 6 points from three matches, with one defeat at the hands of Norway. After a 4–1 win over Chile and a 3–2 success against Denmark, they reached the final with a penalty-shootout victory over the Netherlands. As for France, they sailed through the group stages with three victories and defeated Paraguay in the knockout stages on golden goals. They had a penalty-shootout with Italy in the quarter-finals, and defeated recently-formed Croatia to reach the final.

Despite France's victory, the outcome has been overshadowed in the history books by the condition of the Brazilian striker Ronaldo, who suffered a convulsive fit on the eve of the match. After initially being left out of the team sheet, in spite of his physical state, it was announced just 72 minutes before kick-off that he was going to play. In the match, he sustained an injury in a clash with French goalkeeper Fabien Barthez. Although it was believed that the decision to play Ronaldo had backfired, it was understandable as the player had been a crucial member of the side throughout the tournament, having scored four goals and created three more.

France followed up their victory by qualifying for and winning UEFA Euro 2000 held in the Netherlands and Belgium. Brazil took the Copa America title in 1999, and then won the next FIFA World Cup in Japan and South Korea in 2002. Ronaldo went on to set the record for goals in World Cups.

FRANCE:

GK 16 Fabien Barthez
RB 15 Lilian Thuram
CB 8 Marcel Desailly Yellow cardYellow cardRed card 48', 68'
CB 18 Frank Leboeuf
LB 3 Bixente Lizarazu
DM 7 Didier Deschamps (c) Booked in the 39th minute 39'
CM 17 Emmanuel Petit
CM 19 Christian Karembeu Booked in the 56th minute 56' Substituted off in the 57th minute 57'
CM 10 Zinedine Zidane
AM 6 Youri Djorkaeff Substituted off in the 74th minute 74'
CF 9 Stéphane Guivarc'h Substituted off in the 66th minute 66'
Substitutes:
MF 14 Alain Boghossian Substituted on in the 57th minute 57'
FW 21 Christophe Dugarry Substituted on in the 66th minute 66'
MF 4 Patrick Vieira Substituted on in the 74th minute 74'
Manager:
Aimé Jacquet

2000 New York Yankees

The New York Yankees' 2000 season was the 98th season for the Yankees in New York, and their 100th overall going back to their origins in Baltimore. New York was managed by Joe Torre. The team finished 1st in the AL East with a record of 87–74, 2.5 games ahead of the Boston Red Sox, after losing 15 of their final 18 games. Despite having the lowest winning percentage of any postseason qualifier in 2000, the Yankees won the World Series and over the New York Mets in 5 games to win their 26th World Series title.

2000 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers

* 58 Randy Choate
* 22 Roger Clemens
* 36 David Cone
* 76 Craig Dingman
* 67 Darrell Einertson
* 50 Todd Erdos
* 75 Ben Ford
* 17 Dwight Gooden
* 38 Jason Grimsley
* 26 Orlando Hernández
* 63 Randy Keisler
* 56 Ted Lilly
* 55 Ramiro Mendoza
* 12 Denny Neagle
* 43 Jeff Nelson
* 46 Andy Pettitte
* 42 Mariano Rivera
* 29 Mike Stanton
* 57 Jay Tessmer
* 27 Allen Watson
* 38 Jake Westbrook
* 52 Ed Yarnall

Catchers
* 13 Jim Leyritz
* 20 Jorge Posada
* 25 Chris Turner

Infielders
* 18 Scott Brosius
* 14 Wilson Delgado
* 2 Derek Jeter
* 11 Chuck Knoblauch
* 24 Tino Martinez
* 14 Luis Sojo
* 53,33 Alfonso Soriano
* 13 José Vizcaíno

Outfielders
* 35 Clay Bellinger
* 33 Jose Canseco
* 13 Glenallen Hill
* 31 Lance Johnson
* 45 Félix José
* 28 David Justice
* 39 Roberto Kelly
* 17 Ricky Ledee
* 21 Paul O'Neill
* 19 Luis Polonia
* 47 Shane Spencer
* 33,45 Ryan Thompson
* 51 Bernie Williams

Manager
* 6 Joe Torre

Coaches

* 48 Chris Chambliss (Hitting)
* 40 Tony Cloninger (Bullpen)
* 54 Lee Mazzilli (First Base)
* 30 Willie Randolph (Third Base)
* 34 Mel Stottlemyre (Pitching)
* 52 Don Zimmer (Bench)

1980 Kansas City Royals

The 1980 Kansas City Royals season was a season in American baseball. The Royals finished first in the American League West with a record of 97 wins and 65 losses. They went on to sweep the New York Yankees in the ALCS, then lost to the Philadelphia Phillies in the 1980 World Series, four games to two.

One of the highlights of the season was George Brett winning the American League batting title. Brett's .390 batting average was the highest in the majors since Ted Williams hit .406 in 1941.

Opening Day starters

* Willie Aikens
* George Brett
* Clint Hurdle
* Pete LaCock
* Dennis Leonard
* Hal McRae
* Jamie Quirk
* U L Washington
* Frank White
* Willie Wilson

1980 Kansas City Royals
Roster
Pitchers

* 25 Ken Brett
* 40 Steve Busby
* 28 Craig Chamberlain
* 31 Gary Christenson
* 35 Rawly Eastwick
* 38 Rich Gale
* 32 Larry Gura
* 50 Mike Jones
* 22 Dennis Leonard
* 27 Renie Martin
* 33 Marty Pattin
* 29 Dan Quisenberry
* 34 Paul Splittorff
* 21 Jeff Twitty

Catchers
* 15 Darrell Porter
* 12 John Wathan

Infielders
* 24 Willie Aikens
* 5 George Brett
* 17 Manny Castillo
* 7 Dave Chalk
* 53 Onix Concepción
* 8 Pete LaCock
* 18 Rance Mulliniks
* 52 Ken Phelps
* 9 Jamie Quirk
* 30 U L Washington
* 20 Frank White

Outfielders
* 3 Steve Braun
* 19 José Cardenal
* 4 Bob Detherage
* 10 Clint Hurdle
* 11 Hal McRae
* 26 Amos Otis
* 1 Jerry Terrell
* 2 Rusty Torres
* 6 Willie Wilson

Other batters
* 23 Germán Barranca

Manager
* 41 Jim Frey

Coaches

* 36 Billy Connors
* 43 Gordon Mackenzie
* 42 José Martínez
* 44 Jimmie Schaffer

Pos Player G AB R H 2B 3B Avg. HR RBI SB
C Darrell Porter 118 418 51 104 14 2 .249 7 51 1
1B Willie Aikens 151 543 70 151 24 0 .278 20 98 1
2B Frank White 154 560 70 148 23 4 .264 7 60 19
3B George Brett 117 449 87 175 33 9 .390 24 118 15
SS U L Washington 153 549 79 150 16 11 .273 6 53 20
LF Willie Wilson 161 705 133 230 28 15 .326 3 49 79
CF Amos Otis 107 394 56 99 16 3 .251 10 53 16
RF Clint Hurdle 130 395 50 116 31 2 .294 10 60 0
DH Hal McRae 124 489 73 145 39 5 .297 14 83 10

Player G IP W L ERA BB SO
Larry Gura 36 283.1 18 10 2.95 76 113
Dennis Leonard 38 280.1 20 11 3.79 80 155
Paul Splittorff 34 204 14 11 4.15 43 53
Rich Gale 32 190.2 13 9 3.92 78 97

Saturday, February 25, 2012

1974 FC Bayern Munich

The club had its period of greatest success in the middle of the 1970s when, under the leadership of Franz Beckenbauer, it won the European Cup three times in a row (1974–76).
The 1974 European Cup Final was contested between FC Bayern Munich of West Germany and Atlético Madrid of Spain. Two goals in extra time meant the two sides could not be separated, so a replay was played two days later. Bayern won this match convincingly, with two goals each from Uli Hoeneß and Gerd Müller, giving the German side a 4–0 victory.

BAYERN MUNICH:

GK 1 West Germany Sepp Maier
DF 2 Denmark Johnny Hansen
DF 3 West Germany Paul Breitner
DF 4 West Germany Hans-Georg Schwarzenbeck
DF 5 West Germany Franz Beckenbauer (c)
MF 6 West Germany Franz Roth
MF 7 Sweden Conny Torstensson Substituted off in the 76th minute 76'
MF 8 West Germany Rainer Zobel
FW 9 West Germany Gerd Müller
FW 10 West Germany Uli Hoeneß
MF 11 West Germany Jupp Kapellmann
Substitutes:
MF 12 West Germany Bernd Dürnberger Substituted on in the 76th minute 76'
Manager:
West Germany Udo Lattek

1963–64 UCLA Bruins Men's Basketball Team

The 1963–64 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won its first NCAA National Basketball Championship under head coach John R. Wooden.

In the national title game, the Bruins defeated Duke, coached by Vic Bubas, by the score of 98–83. Walt Hazzard of UCLA was named the tournament's Most Outstanding Player. It was the team's 30th consecutive win, played before 10,684 fans in Municipal Auditorium, Kansas City, Missouri, March 21, 1964.

High scorers were Gail Goodrich, 27 points; Kenny Washington, 26; Jack Hirsch, 13; and Walt Hazzard, 11. Hazzard, Keith Erickson and Duke's Jeff Mullins fouled out of the game.

In the semi-final game, Erickson and Hazzard scored 28 and 19 points respectively to help UCLA to defeat Kansas State 90–84 on March 20.

1963–64 UCLA Bruins men's basketball
AAWU Conference Title
NCAA National Championship Game
vs. Duke, W, 98–83
Conference Athletic Association of Western Universities
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #1
1963–64 record 30–0 (15–0 Big Six)
Head coach John R. Wooden
Assistant coach Jerry Norman
Home arena Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena
Los Angeles, California

* Gail Goodrich, (21.5 ppg/5.2 rpg)
* Fred Slaughter, (7.9 ppg/8.1 rpg)
* Walt Hazzard, (18.6 ppg/4.7 rpg)
* Keith Erickson, (10.7 ppg/9.1 rpg)
* Jack Hirsch, (14.0 ppg/7.6 rpg)
* Doug McIntosh
* Kenny Washington
* Chuck Darrow
* Kim Stewart
* Mike Huggins
* Vaughn Hoffman
* Rich Levin

2001 Arizona Diamondbacks

The 2001 Arizona Diamondbacks, in their fourth year of existence, looked to improve on their 2000 season. They had to contend in what was a strong National League West Division.

Arizona had the best one-two pitching combination in the majors: Curt Schilling and Randy Johnson, who combined for 43 victories. Outfielder Luis Gonzalez slugged 57 home runs. They finished the regular season with a record of 92-70, which was good enough for the division title.

In the playoffs, they won their NLDS matchup vs. St. Louis on a walk-off hit by Tony Womack. They defeated the Braves in five games in the NLCS. In the World Series, they won a dramatic seven-game series against the New York Yankees on a walk-off hit by Gonzalez, against Yankees closer Mariano Rivera. The Arizona Diamondbacks became the fastest expansion franchise in Major League Baseball history to win a World Series title in just their fourth season.

Opening Day starters

* Jay Bell
* David Dellucci
* Steve Finley
* Luis Gonzalez
* Mark Grace
* Damian Miller
* Armando Reynoso
* Matt Williams
* Tony Womack

2001 Arizona Diamondbacks
Roster
Pitchers

* 34 Brian Anderson
* 43 Miguel Batista
* 47 Nick Bierbrodt
* 54 Troy Brohawn
* 55 Robert Ellis
* 50 Geraldo Guzman
* 51 Randy Johnson
* 49 Byung-Hyun Kim
* 57 Eric Knott
* 58 Mike Koplove
* 32 Albie Lopez
* 31 Matt Mantei
* 52 Mike Mohler
* 36 Mike Morgan
* 41 Bret Prinz
* 27 Armando Reynoso
* 56 Erik Sabel
* 38 Curt Schilling
* 36,46 Russ Springer
* 22 Greg Swindell
* 40 Bobby Witt

Catchers
* 48 Rod Barajas
* 8 Mike DiFelice
* 45 Ken Huckaby
* 26 Damian Miller
* 39 Chad Moeller

Infielders
* 33 Jay Bell
* 10 Alex Cintron
* 28 Greg Colbrunn
* 4 Craig Counsell
* 44 Erubiel Durazo
* 17 Mark Grace
* 2 Juan Sosa
* 37 Junior Spivey
* 9 Matt Williams
* 5 Tony Womack

Outfielders
* 29 Danny Bautista
* 6 Ryan Christenson
* 6 Jason Conti
* 13 Midre Cummings
* 19 Jack Cust
* 25 David Dellucci
* 12 Steve Finley
* 20 Luis Gonzalez
* 16 Reggie Sanders

Other batters
* 61 Lyle Overbay
* 8 Rob Ryan

Manager
* 15 Bob Brenly

Coaches

* 3 Bob Melvin (Bench)
* 21 Dwayne Murphy (Hitting)
* 14 Eddie Rodriguez (1st Base)
* 53 Glenn Sherlock (Bullpen)
* 16 Chris Speier (3rd Base)
* 32 Bob Welch (Pitching)

1980 Philadelphia Phillies

The 1980 Philadelphia Phillies season was a season in American baseball. The team finished with a regular-season record of 91 wins and 71 losses, which was good enough to regain the National League East title by just one game over the Montreal Expos. The Phillies went on to defeat the Houston Astros in the NLCS to gain their first NL title since 1950, then defeated the Kansas City Royals to win their first-ever World Series Championship, taking 98 seasons to do so. The Phillies were known as "The Cardiac Kids" due to close games that were almost blown.

1980 Philadelphia Phillies
Roster
Pitchers

* 40 Warren Brusstar
* 50 Marty Bystrom
* 32 Steve Carlton
* 38 Larry Christenson
* 43 Mark Davis
* 35 Nino Espinosa
* 39 Lerrin LaGrow
* 49 Dan Larson
* 47 Randy Lerch
* 39 Sparky Lyle
* 45 Tug McGraw
* 34 Scott Munninghoff
* 48 Dickie Noles
* 42 Ron Reed
* 44 Dick Ruthven
* 33 Kevin Saucier
* 41 Bob Walk

Catchers
* 8 Bob Boone
* 17 Don McCormack
* 6 Keith Moreland
* 24 Ozzie Virgil

Infielders

* 16 Luis Aguayo
* 15 Ramón Avilés
* 10 Larry Bowa
* 22 Jay Loviglio
* 11 Tim McCarver
* 14 Pete Rose
* 20 Mike Schmidt
* 9 Manny Trillo
* 25 Del Unser
* 18 John Vukovich

Outfielders
* 30 Bob Dernier
* 23 Greg Gross
* 28 Orlando Isales
* 19 Greg Luzinski
* 31 Garry Maddox
* 21 Bake McBride
* 27 Lonnie Smith
* 29 George Vukovich

Manager
* 46 Dallas Green

Coaches

* 12 Ruben Amaro
* 2 Billy DeMars
* 3 Lee Elia
* 5 Mike Ryan
* 4 Herm Starrette
* 7 Bobby Wine

Pos Player G AB R H 2B 3B Avg. HR RBI SB
C Bob Boone 141 480 34 110 23 1 .229 9 55 3
1B Pete Rose 162 655 95 185 42 1 .282 1 64 12
2B Manny Trillo 141 531 68 155 25 9 .292 7 43 8
3B Mike Schmidt 150 548 104 157 25 8 .286 48 121 12
SS Larry Bowa 147 540 57 144 16 4 .267 2 39 21
LF Greg Luzinski 106 368 44 84 19 1 .228 19 56 3
CF Garry Maddox 143 549 59 142 31 3 .259 11 73 25
RF Bake McBride 137 554 68 171 33 10 .309 9 87 13

Player G IP W L ERA BB SO
Steve Carlton 38 304 24 9 2.34 90 286
Dick Ruthven 33 223.1 17 10 3.55 74 86
Bob Walk 27 151.2 11 7 4.57 71 94
Randy Lerch 30 150 4 14 5.16 55 57
Nino Espinosa 12 76.1 3 5 3.77 19 13
Larry Christenson 14 73.2 5 1 4.03 27 49
Marty Bystrom 6 36 5 0 1.50 9 21

Friday, February 24, 2012

2001–02 Maryland Terrapins Men's Basketball Team

2001–02 Maryland Terrapins men's basketball
NCAA Men's Division I Tournament, Champions
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #4
2001–02 record 30–4 (15–1 ACC)
Head coach Gary Williams
Assistant coach Jimmy Patsos
Assistant coach Dave Dickerson
Assistant coach Matt Kovarik
Home arena Cole Field House

Name Number Position Height Weight Year Hometown
Earl Badu 4 Guard 6–0 160 Senior Baltimore, MD
Lonny Baxter 35 Forward/Center 6–8 260 Senior Silver Spring, MD
Steve Blake 25 Guard 6–3 172 Junior Miami Lakes, FL
Andre Collins 10 Guard 5–9 180 Freshman Crisfield, MD
Juan Dixon 3 Guard 6–3 164 Senior Baltimore, MD
Mike Grinnon 21 Forward 6–6 225 Freshman Huntington, NY
Tahj Holden 45 Forward/Center 6–10 270 Junior Red Bank, NJ
Calvin McCall 5 Guard 6–3 200 Senior Miami, FL
Byron Mouton 1 Guard/Forward 6–6 215 Senior Rayne, LA
Drew Nicholas 12 Guard 6–3 160 Junior Hempstead, NY
Ryan Randle 33 Forward/Center 6–9 255 Junior Duncanville, TX
Chris Wilcox 54 Forward/Center 6–10 220 Sophomore Raleigh, NC

* Head Coach – Gary Williams
* Assistant Coaches – Jimmy Patsos, Dave Dickerson and Matt Kovarik

1964–65 UCLA Bruins Men's Basketball

The 1964–65 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won its second NCAA National Basketball Championship under head coach John R. Wooden.

Before a crowd of 13,204 in Portland Memorial Coliseum, Portland, Oregon, the Bruins won the national championship over Michigan, 91–80, for the second consecutive year. Gail Goodrich's 42 points and Kenny Washington's 17 points helped UCLA to become the fifth team to win consecutive championships. Wooden liked Goodrich for his "poise, quickness and speed".

The team finished the season with a 28–2 record, winning the last 15 games and scoring a team record of 400 points in the four tournament games. Brigham Young, San Francisco, and Wichita were also eliminated by the Bruins.

1964–65 UCLA Bruins men's basketball
AAWU Conference Title
NCAA National Championship Game
vs. Michigan, W, 91–80
Conference Athletic Association of Western Universities
Ranking
Coaches #2
AP #2
1964–65 record 28–2 (14–0 Pac-8)
Head coach John R. Wooden
Assistant coach Jerry Norman
Home arena Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena
Los Angeles, California

* Edgar Lacey
* Keith Erickson
* Doug McIntosh
* Gail Goodrich
* Freddie Goss
* Kenny Washington
* Mike Lynn
* Brice Chambers
* John Lyons
* Rich Levin
* John Galbraith
* Vaugh Hoffman

2002 Anaheim Angels

The Anaheim Angels' 2002 season was the franchise's 42nd, and it ended with the team's first American League pennant and World Series championship.

The Angels finished the regular season with a record of 99-63, 4 games behind the Oakland Athletics in the American League West standings, but qualified for the franchise's first ever Wild Card playoff berth to return to the postseason for the first time since 1986. Outfielder Garrett Anderson led the team with 123 runs batted in and a .539 slugging percentage, was selected for the AL All-Star team, and won the Silver Slugger Award. Jarrod Washburn went 18-6 with a 3.15 earned run average to anchor a pitching staff that allowed the fewest runs in the league.

In the postseason, the Angels defeated the New York Yankees 3-1 in the American League Division Series, then defeated the Minnesota Twins 4-1 in the American League Championship Series to win the AL pennant. The Angels then won the World Series in dramatic fashion when, with a 3-2 series deficit to the San Francisco Giants, they overcame a 5 run deficit in the late innings of Game 6 to force a winner-take-all Game 7, which they won to clinch the series 4-3. The morning after the win, The Orange County Register celebrated the Angels' win with the headline "7th Heaven,"referring to the popular television series and fact that it took seven games for the Angels to win the World Series, and in doing so, it sent them to seventh heaven.

2002 was also notable as the season in which the Angels debuted their present-day uniforms, colors, and halo insignia, which replaced the widely ridiculed "periwinkle" uniforms and "winged" insignia they had worn since 1997. It was also the last full season the team was owned by The Walt Disney Company, which sold its controlling interest in the team to present-day owner Arte Moreno in May 2003.

2002 Anaheim Angels
Roster
Pitchers

* 27 Kevin Appier
* 51 Mickey Callaway
* 21 Dennis Cook
* 53 Brendan Donnelly
* 41 John Lackey
* 43 Al Levine
* 47 Mark Lukasiewicz
* 36 Ramón Ortiz
* 40 Troy Percival
* 58 Lou Pote
* 57 Francisco Rodríguez
* 60 Scott Schoeneweis
* 34 Aaron Sele
* 62 Scot Shields
* 18 Donne Wall
* 56 Jarrod Washburn
* 77 Ben Weber
* 32 Matt Wise

Catchers
* 6 Jorge Fabregas
* 9 Sal Fasano
* 1 Bengie Molina
* 28 José Molina

Infielders
* 5 Alfredo Amezaga
* 35 Clay Bellinger
* 22 David Eckstein
* 6 Chone Figgins
* 20 Brad Fullmer
* 10 Benji Gil
* 25 Troy Glaus
* 2 Adam Kennedy
* 8 José Nieves
* 23 Scott Spiezio
* 44 Shawn Wooten

Outfielders
* 16 Garret Anderson
* 33 Jeff DaVanon
* 17 Darin Erstad
* 18 Alex Ochoa
* 3 Orlando Palmeiro
* 39 Julio Ramírez
* 15 Tim Salmon

Manager
* 14 Mike Scioscia

Coaches

* 24 Bud Black (pitching)
* 4 Alfredo Griffin (first base)
* 7 Mickey Hatcher (hitting)
* 70 Joe Maddon (bench)
* 13 Bobby Ramos (bullpen)
* 12 Ron Roenicke (third base)

1981 New York Yankees

The New York Yankees' 1981 season was the 79th season for the Yankees. In the ALCS, the Yankees swept the Oakland Athletics for their only pennant of the 1980s. However, they lost in the World Series in 6 games to the Los Angeles Dodgers. New York was managed by Gene Michael and Bob Lemon. The Yankees played at Yankee Stadium.

1981 New York Yankees
Roster
Pitchers

* 43 Doug Bird
* 35,56 Bill Castro
* 39 Ron Davis
* 43 George Frazier
* 54 Goose Gossage
* 52 Mike Griffin
* 49 Ron Guidry
* 25 Tommy John
* 34 Dave LaRoche
* 45 Rudy May
* 58 Andy McGaffigan
* 46,55 Gene Nelson
* 36 Rick Reuschel
* 19 Dave Righetti
* 38 Tom Underwood
* 58 Dave Wehrmeister

Catchers
* 10 Rick Cerone
* 23 Barry Foote
* 26 Johnny Oates

Infielders
* 57 Tucker Ashford
* 66 Steve Balboni
* 20 Bucky Dent
* 18 Larry Milbourne
* 9 Graig Nettles
* 30 Willie Randolph
* 12 Dave Revering
* 55 Andre Robertson
* 27 Aurelio Rodríguez
* 12 Jim Spencer
* 28 Bob Watson
* 24 Dennis Werth

Outfielders
* 13 Bobby Brown
* 17 Oscar Gamble
* 44 Reggie Jackson
* 22 Jerry Mumphrey
* 56 Mike Patterson
* 14 Lou Piniella
* 31 Dave Winfield

Other batters
* 2 Bobby Murcer

Manager
* 21 Bob Lemon
* 11 Gene Michael

Coaches
* 48 Joe Altobelli
* 8 Yogi Berra
* 33 Mike Ferraro
* 40 Charley Lau
* 41 Jeff Torborg
* 42 Stan William

Pos Player G AB R H Avg. HR RBI SB
C Rick Cerone 71 234 23 57 .244 2 21 0
1B Bob Watson 59 156 15 33 .212 6 12 0
2B Willie Randolph 93 357 59 83 .232 2 24 14
SS Bucky Dent 73 227 20 54 .238 7 27 0
3B Graig Nettles 103 349 46 85 .244 15 46 0
LF Dave Winfield 105 388 52 114 .294 13 68 11
CF Jerry Mumphrey 80 319 44 98 .307 6 32 14
RF Reggie Jackson 94 334 33 79 .237 15 54 0
DH Bobby Murcer 50 117 14 31 .265 6 24 0

Thursday, February 23, 2012

2002–03 Syracuse Orangemen Basketball Team

The 2002–03 Syracuse Orangemen basketball team represented Syracuse University in NCAA men's basketball competition in the 2002–03 Division I season. (At that time, "Orangemen" was exclusively used to refer to Syracuse men's teams; women's teams were known as "Orangewomen".) The Head Coach was Jim Boeheim, serving for his 27th year. The team played its home games at the Carrier Dome in Syracuse, New York. The team finished with a 30–5 (13–3) record, while capturing its first modern-era NCAA Championship.

The team had just one senior, guard Kueth Duany. He was joined in the starting lineup by forwards Hakim Warrick (sophomore), Carmelo Anthony (freshman), center Craig Forth (sophomore) and guard Gerry McNamara (freshman). Other key contributors included guards Josh Pace (sophomore) and Billy Edelin (freshman), and center Jeremy McNeil (junior).

2002–03 Syracuse Orangemen men's basketball
NCAA National Champions
Big East Regular Season Co-Champions
National Championship vs. Kansas, W, 81–78
Conference Big East Conference
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #13
2002–03 record 30–5 (13–3 Big East)
Head coach Jim Boeheim
Assistant coach Bernie Fine
Assistant coach Mike Hopkins
Assistant coach Troy Weaver
Home arena Carrier Dome

Name Number Position Height Weight Year Hometown PPG APG RPG
Hakim Warrick 1 F 6–9 219 Sophomore Philadelphia, PA 14.8 1.6 8.5
Gerry McNamara 3 G 6–2 182 Freshman Scranton, PA 13.3 4.4 2.3
Josh Pace 5 G/F 6–5 190 Sophomore Griffin, GA 4.3 1.9 2.7
Kueth Duany 13 G/F 6–6 190 Senior Sudan/Bloomington, IN 11.0 2.0 3.7
Billy Edelin 14 G 6–4 195 Freshman Silver Spring, MD 9.0 2.5 3.4
Carmelo Anthony 15 F 6–8 230 Freshman Brooklyn, NY 22.2 2.2 10.0
Matt Gorman 24 F/C 6–9 235 Freshman Watertown, NY 2.3 0.1 2.1
Jeremy McNeil 34 C 6–8 257 Junior San Antonio, TX 3.3 0.2 4.2
Craig Forth 51 C 7–1 255 Sophomore Albany, NY 3.8 0.9 3.3

2003 Florida Marlins

The 2003 Florida Marlins season was a season in American baseball. The Marlins were the National League Wild Card Winners, the National League Champions, and the World Series Champions.

Opening Day starters

* Josh Beckett
* Luis Castillo
* Juan Encarnacion
* Álex González
* Todd Hollandsworth
* Derrek Lee
* Mike Lowell
* Juan Pierre
* Ivan Rodriguez

2003 Florida Marlins
Roster
Pitchers

* 29 Armando Almanza
* 32 Juan Alvarez
* 61,21 Josh Beckett
* 33 Toby Borland
* 40 Nate Bump
* 34 A. J. Burnett
* 49 Chad Fox
* 38 Rick Helling
* 44 Allen Levrault
* 41 Braden Looper
* 39 Blaine Neal
* 36 Vladimir Núñez
* 56 Kevin Olsen
* 45 Carl Pavano
* 31 Brad Penny
* 57 Tommy Phelps
* 55 Mark Redman
* 91 Tim Spooneybarger
* 58 Michael Tejera
* 74 Ugueth Urbina
* 48 Justin Wayne
* 35 Dontrelle Willis

Catchers
* 17 Ramón Castro
* 52 Mike Redmond
* 7 Iván Rodríguez

Infielders
* 1 Luis Castillo
* 11 Álex González
* 25 Derrek Lee
* 19 Mike Lowell

Outfielders
* 21 Chad Allen
* 20 Miguel Cabrera
* 18 Jeff Conine
* 43 Juan Encarnación
* 14 Todd Hollandsworth
* 9 Juan Pierre
* 4 Gerald Williams

Other batters
* 22 Brian Banks
* 6 Andy Fox
* 10 Lenny Harris
* 12 Mike Mordecai

Manager
* 15 Jack McKeon
* 13 Jeff Torborg

Coaches

* 38 Brad Arnsberg (pitching)
* 67 Pierre Arsenault (bullpen)
* 47 Jeff Cox (bench)
* 13 Ozzie Guillén (third base)
* 16 Perry Hill (first base)
* 28 Bill Robinson (hitting)

1981 Los Angeles Dodgers

The 1981 Los Angeles Dodgers season got off to a strong start when rookie pitcher Fernando Valenzuela pitched a shutout on opening day, starting the craze that came to be known as "Fernandomania." Fernando went on to win both the Rookie of the Year and Cy Young Awards.

The season was divided into two halves because of a players strike in mid-season. The Dodgers won the Western Division of the National League in the first half and advanced to the playoffs. They beat the Houston Astros in a divisional playoff and the Montreal Expos in the National League Championship Series before beating the New York Yankees to win the World Series.

Opening Day Starters
Name Position
Davey Lopes Second baseman
Ken Landreaux Center fielder
Dusty Baker Left fielder
Steve Garvey First baseman
Ron Cey Third baseman
Pedro Guerrero Right fielder
Mike Scioscia Catcher
Bill Russell Shortstop
Fernando Valenzuela Starting pitcher

1981 Los Angeles Dodgers
Roster
Pitchers

* 37 Bobby Castillo
* 51 Terry Forster
* 38 Dave Goltz
* 46 Burt Hooton
* 57 Steve Howe
* 49 Tom Niedenfuer
* 26 Alejandro Peña
* 25 Ted Power
* 41 Jerry Reuss
* 48 Dave Stewart
* 43 Rick Sutcliffe
* 34 Fernando Valenzuela
* 35 Bob Welch

Catchers
* 9 Jerry Grote
* 14 Mike Scioscia
* 7 Steve Yeager

Infielders

* 10 Ron Cey
* 36 Pepe Frias
* 6 Steve Garvey
* 15 Davey Lopes
* 5 Mike Marshall
* 45 Jack Perconte
* 18 Bill Russell
* 52 Steve Sax
* 8 Reggie Smith
* 30 Derrel Thomas
* 1 Gary Weiss

Outfielders
* 12 Dusty Baker
* 22 Mark Bradley
* 13 Joe Ferguson
* 28 Pedro Guerrero
* 21 Jay Johnstone
* 44 Ken Landreaux
* 47 Candy Maldonado
* 17 Bobby Mitchell
* 16 Rick Monday
* 50 Ron Roenicke

Manager
* 2 Tommy Lasorda

Coaches

* 54 Monty Basgall
* 58 Mark Cresse
* 11 Manny Mota
* 33 Danny Ozark
* 29 Ron Perranoski

Name G GS IP ERA W/L BB SO CG
Fernando Valenzuela 25 25 192.3 2.48 13-7 61 180 11
Burt Hooton 23 23 142.3 2.28 11-6 33 74 5
Bob Welch 23 23 141.3 3.44 9-5 41 88 2
Jerry Reuss 22 22 152.7 2.30 10-4 27 51 8

Name Pos G AB Avg. R H HR RBI SB
Mike Scioscia C 93 290 .276 27 80 2 29 0
Steve Yeager C 42 86 .209 5 18 3 7 0
Jerry Grote C 2 2 .000 0 0 0 0 0
Steve Garvey 1B 110 431 .283 63 122 10 64 3
Davey Lopes 2B 58 214 .289 35 44 5 17 20
Bill Russell SS 82 262 .233 20 61 0 22 2
Ron Cey 3B 85 312 .288 42 90 13 50 0
Derrel Thomas 2B/3B/SS/OF 80 218 .248 25 54 4 24 7
Steve Sax 2B 31 119 .277 15 33 2 9 5
Pepe Frias SS/2B/3B 25 36 .250 6 9 0 3 0
Reggie Smith 1B 41 35 .200 5 7 1 8 0
Mike Marshall 1B/3B/OF 14 25 .200 2 5 0 1 0
Gary Weiss SS 14 19 .105 2 2 0 1 0
Jack Perconte 2B 8 9 .222 2 2 0 1 1
Dusty Baker OF 103 400 .320 48 128 9 49 10
Pedro Guerrero OF/3B/1B 98 347 .300 46 104 12 48 5
Ken Landreaux OF 99 390 .251 48 98 7 41 18
Rick Monday OF 66 130 .315 24 41 11 25 1
Jay Johnstone OF/1B 61 83 .205 8 17 3 6 0
Ron Roenicke OF 22 47 .234 6 11 0 0 1
Joe Ferguson OF 17 14 .143 2 2 0 1 0
Candy Maldonado OF 11 12 .093 0 1 0 0 0
Bobby Mitchell OF 10 5 .125 0 1 0 0 0
Mark Bradley OF 9 6 .167 2 1 0 0 0

Wednesday, February 22, 2012

2003–04 Connecticut Huskies men's basketball team

The 2003–2004 Connecticut Huskies men's basketball team represented the University of Connecticut in the 2003–2004 NCAA Division I basketball season. Coached by Jim Calhoun, the Huskies played their home games at the Hartford Civic Center in Hartford, Connecticut, and on campus at the Harry A. Gampel Pavilion in Storrs, Connecticut, and are a member of the Big East Conference. They won their record-tying sixth Big East tournament. On April 6, 2004, they claimed their second national championship by defeating Georgia Tech, 82–73.

G/F 31 Rashad Anderson So Lakeland, FL
4.5 F/C 11 Hilton Armstrong So Peekskill, NY
1.5 G 24 Jason Baisch Jr Southbury, CT
4.5 F/C 21 Josh Boone So Mt. Airy, MD
3.5 F 33 Denham Brown So Toronto, Canada
1.5 G 12 Taliek Brown Sr Queens, NY
1.5 G 40 Justin Evanovich Sr Ann Arbor, MI
1.5 G 4 Ben Gordon Jr Mt. Vernon, NY
3.5 F 32 Ed Nelson (I) Current redshirt Jr Ft. Lauderdale, FL
4.5 F/C 50 Emeka Okafor Jr Bellaire, TX
3.5 F 2 Ryan Swaller Sr Milford, CT
3.5 F 13 Ryan Thompson Jr Gold Coast, Australia
2.5 G/F 30 Shamon Tooles Sr Coatesville, PA
3.5 F 3 Charlie Villanueva Fr Brooklyn, NY
3.5 F 23 Marcus White So Chicago, IL
1.5 G 5 Marcus Williams (S) Fr Los Angeles, CA

2003–04 Connecticut Huskies men's basketball
Big East Tournament Champions
NCAA Men's Division I Tournament, Champions
Conference Big East Conference
Ranking
Coaches #7
AP #7
2003–04 record 33–6 (12–4 Big East)
Head coach Jim Calhoun
Assistant coach Tom Moore
Assistant coach George Blaney
Assistant coach Andre LaFleur
Home arena Harry A. Gampel Pavilion

2004 Boston Red Sox

2004 Boston Red Sox

The Boston Red Sox 2004 season was the 103rd Major League Baseball season for the Boston Red Sox franchise. Managed under Terry Francona, the team finished with a 98–64 record (three games behind the New York Yankees in the American League East Division). The Red Sox played in Fenway Park to a local attendance of 2,837,294 fans.

They clinched the AL wild card to assure a berth in the 2004 post-season. They swept the Anaheim Angels in the first round to enter the ALCS against the Yankees for the second straight year.

As Boston entered the fourth game of the ALCS, they had fallen three games behind the Yankees, including a Game Three loss by the score of 19–8.

Trailing 4-3 in the 9th inning of Game 4, they embarked upon an unprecedented (in baseball) comeback from a three-game deficit to defeat the New York Yankees in the series. After the ALCS, the Red Sox swept the Cardinals to win their first World Series since 1918 (86 years)

Opening Day lineup
18 Johnny Damon CF
11 Bill Mueller 3B
24 Manny Ramírez LF
34 David Ortiz DH
15 Kevin Millar 1B
19 Gabe Kapler RF
33 Jason Varitek C
12 Mark Bellhorn 2B
3 Pokey Reese SS
45 Pedro Martínez P

2004 Boston Red Sox roster
Roster
Pitchers

* 53 Terry Adams
* 59 Abe Alvarez
* 56 Jimmy Anderson
* 61 Bronson Arroyo
* 39 Pedro Astacio
* 52 Jamie Brown
* 37 Frank Castillo
* 55 Lenny DiNardo
* 43 Alan Embree
* 29 Keith Foulke
* 36 Bobby Jones
* 51 Byung-Hyun Kim
* 30 Curtis Leskanic
* 32 Derek Lowe
* 46 Mark Malaska
* 67 Anastacio Martínez
* 45 Pedro Martínez
* 26 Ramiro Mendoza
* 36 Mike Myers
* 57 Joe Nelson
* 38 Curt Schilling
* 53 Phil Seibel
* 50 Mike Timlin
* 49 Tim Wakefield
* 48 Scott Williamson

Catchers
* 58 Sandy Martínez
* 28 Doug Mirabelli
* 33 Jason Varitek

Infielders
* 12 Mark Bellhorn
* 36,44 Orlando Cabrera
* 31 César Crespo
* 23 Brian Daubach
* 39 Andy Dominique
* 5 Nomar Garciaparra
* 16 Ricky Gutiérrez
* 10 David McCarty
* 13 Doug Mientkiewicz
* 11 Bill Mueller
* 3 Pokey Reese
* 37 Earl Snyder
* 20 Kevin Youkilis

Outfielders
* 18 Johnny Damon
* 37 Adam Hyzdu
* 19 Gabe Kapler
* 15 Kevin Millar
* 7 Trot Nixon
* 24 Manny Ramírez
* 31 Dave Roberts

Designated hitter
* 34 David Ortiz

Pinch hitter
* 25 Ellis Burks

Manager
* 47 Terry Francona

Coaches

* 44 Bill Haselman (Interim 1B)
* 22 Ron Jackson (Hitting)
* 35 Lynn Jones (First base)
* 60 Dana Levangie (Bullpen catcher)
* 2 Brad Mills (Bench)
* 54 Euclides Rojas (Bullpen)
* 41 Dale Sveum (Third base)
* 17 Dave Wallace (Pitching)

1982 Milwaukee Brewers

The 1982 Milwaukee Brewers season resulted in the team winning its first and only American League Championship.

* August 27, 1982: Against the Brewers, Rickey Henderson broke Lou Brock's record for most stolen bases in one season. Doc Medich was on the mound when Henderson broke the record.
* September 24, 1982: Robin Yount had 6 RBIs in a game against the Baltimore Orioles.
* Paul Molitor’s 136 runs not only led the American League, but they were the most scored in the league since 1949.
* Robin Yount became the first shortstop in American League history to lead the league in slugging percentage. He would go on to lead the league in hits, doubles, and total bases as he was voted the American League Most Valuable Player.

1982 Milwaukee Brewers
Roster
Pitchers

* 46 Jerry Augustine
* 47 Dwight Bernard
* 48 Mike Caldwell
* 28 Jamie Easterly
* 34 Rollie Fingers
* 30 Moose Haas
* 45,54 Doug Jones
* 27 Pete Ladd
* 35 Randy Lerch
* 10 Bob McClure
* 33 Doc Medich
* 43 Chuck Porter
* 41 Jim Slaton
* 21 Don Sutton
* 50 Pete Vuckovich

Catchers
* 23 Ted Simmons
* 5 Ned Yost

Infielders
* 15 Cecil Cooper
* 17 Jim Gantner
* 4 Paul Molitor
* 8 Rob Picciolo
* 11 Ed Romero
* 19 Robin Yount

Outfielders
* 26 Kevin Bass
* 29 Mark Brouhard
* 16 Marshall Edwards
* 22 Charlie Moore
* 24 Ben Oglivie
* 26 Bob Skube
* 20 Gorman Thomas

Other batters
* 9 Larry Hisle
* 13 Roy Howell
* 7 Don Money

Manager
* 32 Harvey Kuenn (6/2 - )
* 37 Buck Rodgers (4/9 - 6/1)

Coaches

* -- Pat Dobson (Pitching)
* 12 Larry Haney (Bullpen)
* 18 Ron Hansen (First Base)
* 32 Harvey Kuenn (Hitting 4/9 - 6/2)
* 38 Cal McLish (Pitching)
* 36 Harry Warner (Third Base)

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Ted Simmons 137 539 145 .269 23 97
1B Cecil Cooper 155 654 205 .313 32 121
2B Jim Gantner 132 447 132 .295 4 43
3B Paul Molitor 160 666 201 .302 19 71
SS Robin Yount 156 635 210 .331 29 114
LF Ben Oglivie 159 602 147 .244 34 102
CF Gorman Thomas 158 567 139 .245 39 112
RF Charlie Moore 133 456 116 .254 6 45

Tuesday, February 21, 2012

MLB All-Time RBI Leaders

Rank Player (yrs, age) Runs Batted In Bats
1. Hank Aaron+ (23) 2297 R
2. Babe Ruth+ (22) 2213 L
3. Cap Anson+ (27) 2075 R
4. Barry Bonds (22) 1996 L
5. Lou Gehrig+ (17) 1995 L
6. Stan Musial+ (22) 1951 L
7. Ty Cobb+ (24) 1938 L
8. Jimmie Foxx+ (20) 1922 R
9. Eddie Murray+ (21) 1917 B
10. Willie Mays+ (22) 1903 R
11. Alex Rodriguez (18, 35) 1893 R
12. Mel Ott+ (22) 1860 L
13. Carl Yastrzemski+ (23) 1844 L
14. Ted Williams+ (19) 1839 L
15. Ken Griffey (22) 1836 L
16. Rafael Palmeiro (20) 1835 L
17. Dave Winfield+ (22) 1833 R
18. Manny Ramirez (19, 39) 1831 R
19. Al Simmons+ (20) 1827 R
20. Frank Robinson+ (21) 1812 R
21. Honus Wagner+ (21) 1733 R
22. Frank Thomas (19) 1704 R
23. Reggie Jackson+ (21) 1702 L
24. Cal Ripken+ (21) 1695 R
25. Gary Sheffield (22) 1676 R
26. Jim Thome (21, 40) 1674 L
27. Sammy Sosa (18) 1667 R
28. Tony Perez+ (23) 1652 R
29. Ernie Banks+ (19) 1636 R
30. Harold Baines (22) 1628 L
31. Goose Goslin+ (18) 1609 L
32. Nap Lajoie+ (21) 1599 R
33. George Brett+ (21) 1596 L
34. Mike Schmidt+ (18) 1595 R
35. Andre Dawson+ (21) 1591 R
36. Rogers Hornsby+ (23) 1584 R
Harmon Killebrew+ (22) 1584 R
38. Al Kaline+ (22) 1583 R
39. Jake Beckley+ (20) 1578 L
40. Chipper Jones (18, 39) 1561 B
41. Willie McCovey+ (22) 1555 L
42. Fred McGriff (19) 1550 L
43. Willie Stargell+ (21) 1540 L
44. Harry Heilmann+ (17) 1539 R
45. Joe DiMaggio+ (13) 1537 R
46. Jeff Bagwell (15) 1529 R
Tris Speaker+ (22) 1529 L
48. Sam Crawford+ (19) 1525 L
49. Jeff Kent (17) 1518 R
50. Carlos Delgado (17) 1512 L
51. Mickey Mantle+ (18) 1509 B
52. Vladimir Guerrero (16, 36) 1496 R
53. Dave Parker (19) 1493 L
54. Billy Williams+ (18) 1475 L
55. Ed Delahanty+ (16) 1466 R
Rusty Staub (23) 1466 L
57. Eddie Mathews+ (17) 1453 L
58. Jim Rice+ (16) 1451 R
59. Joe Carter (16) 1445 R
60. George Davis+ (20) 1440 B
61. Luis Gonzalez (19) 1439 L
62. Yogi Berra+ (19) 1430 L
63. Charlie Gehringer+ (19) 1427 L
64. Andres Galarraga (19) 1425 R
65. Joe Cronin+ (20) 1424 R
66. Jim Bottomley+ (16) 1422 L
67. Mark McGwire (16) 1414 R
68. Jose Canseco (17) 1407 R
69. Robin Yount+ (20) 1406 R
70. Juan Gonzalez (17) 1404 R
71. Jason Giambi (17, 40) 1397 L
72. Ted Simmons (21) 1389 B
73. Dwight Evans (20) 1384 R
74. Joe Medwick+ (17) 1383 R
75. Lave Cross (21) 1378 R
76. Johnny Bench+ (17) 1376 R
77. Chili Davis (19) 1372 B
78. Garret Anderson (17) 1365 L
Orlando Cepeda+ (17) 1365 R
80. Brooks Robinson+ (23) 1357 R
81. Darrell Evans (21) 1354 L
82. Gary Gaetti (20) 1341 R
83. Johnny Mize+ (15) 1337 L
84. Mike Piazza (16) 1335 R
85. Duke Snider+ (18) 1333 L
86. Ivan Rodriguez (21, 39) 1332 R
87. Ron Santo+ (15) 1331 R
88. Carlton Fisk+ (24) 1330 R
89. Albert Pujols (11, 31) 1329 R
90. Al Oliver (18) 1326 L
91. Bobby Abreu (16, 37) 1325 L
92. Roger Connor+ (18) 1323 L
93. Ruben Sierra (20) 1322 B
94. Graig Nettles (22) 1314 L
Pete Rose (24) 1314 B
96. Mickey Vernon (20) 1311 L
Larry Walker (17) 1311 L
98. Paul Waner+ (20) 1309 L
99. Steve Garvey (19) 1308 R
Todd Helton (15, 37) 1308 L

1972 AFC Ajax

Amsterdamsche Football Club Ajax also referred to as AFC Ajax, Ajax Amsterdam or simply Ajax (after the legendary Greek hero), is a professional football club from Amsterdam, Netherlands. In 1972, they completed the European treble by winning the Dutch Eredivisie, KNVB Cup, and the European Cup; to date, they are the only team to keep the European Cup and accomplish the European treble.

The 1972 European Cup Final was a football match held at De Kuip, Rotterdam, on 31 May 1972, that saw Ajax of the Netherlands defeat Internazionale of Italy 2-0. Two second-half goals from Johan Cruyff gave Ajax their second success in the competition, after their 1971 victory. This game is often said to be Total Football's greatest moment, Ajax dominated much of the game as Inter defended desperately.

GK 1 Netherlands Heinz Stuy
DF 3 Netherlands Wim Suurbier
DF 13 Netherlands Barry Hulshoff
DF 12 West Germany Horst Blankenburg
DF 5 Netherlands Ruud Krol
MF 7 Netherlands Johan Neeskens
MF 15 Netherlands Arie Haan
MF 9 Netherlands Gerrie Mühren
FW 8 Netherlands Sjaak Swart
FW 14 Netherlands Johan Cruijff
FW 11 Netherlands Piet Keizer (c)

Manager:
Romania Stefan Kovacs

1966–67 UCLA Bruins Men's Basketball Team

1966–67 UCLA Bruins men's basketball
Los Angeles Classic,
AAWU Conference Championship
NCAA National Championship Game
vs. Dayton, W, 79–64
Conference Athletic Association of Western Universities
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #1
1966–67 record 30–0 (14–0 Pac-8)
Head coach John R. Wooden
Assistant coach Jerry Norman
Home arena Pauley Pavilion
Los Angeles, California

The 1966–67 UCLA Bruins men's basketball team won UCLA's third NCAA National Basketball Championship under head coach John Wooden with a win over Dayton.

In the NCAA West Regional at Corvallis, Oregon, the Bruins beat Wyoming (109–60) and Pacific (80–64). The Final Four was played in Louisville, Kentucky, where UCLA defeated Houston (73–58) and Dayton (79–64).

The team was led by starters Lynn Shackelford, Kenny Heitz, Lew Alcindor (now Kareem Abdul-Jabbar), Mike Warren, and Lucius Allen.

This was the season Lew Alcindor, later to be known as Kareem Abdul-Jabbar, debuted on to the college basketball scene. After sitting out his freshman year under then NCAA rules, Alcindor dominated as a sophomore, leading ucla to a 30-0 record while averaging 29.0 and 15.5 rebounds. Three other players averaged in double figures, including sophomore guard Lucius Allen and junior Mike Warren.

* Don Saffer
* Lucius Allen
* Dick Lynn
* Gene Sutherland
* Mike Warren
* Joe Chrisman
* Lynn Shackelford
* Neville Saner
* Lew Alcindor
* Jim Nielsen
* Ken Heitz
* Bill Sweek

# UCLA won the L.A. Classic by defeating Wisconsin, Georgia Tech, and USC.
# Bruins' third national championship in four years.
# The dunk was banned in college basketball after the season, primarily because of Alcindor's dominant use of the shot.

2005 Chicago White Sox

The 2005 Chicago White Sox season was the White Sox's 105th season. They finished with a 99-63 record in the regular season and won first-place the American League Central division by six games over the Cleveland Indians. In the playoffs, they won the American League Division Series 3-0 over the Boston Red Sox, the American League Championship Series 4-1 over the Los Angeles Angels of Anaheim, and the World Series 4-0 over the Houston Astros.

Opening Day Lineup
Roster
Position Player
LF Scott Podsednik
2B Tadahito Iguchi
DH Carl Everett
1B Paul Konerko
RF Jermaine Dye
CF Aaron Rowand
C A. J. Pierzynski
3B Joe Crede
SS Juan Uribe
P Mark Buehrle

2005 Chicago White Sox
Roster
Pitchers
* 37 Jon Adkins
* 57 Jeff Bajenaru
* 56 Mark Buehrle
* 52 José Contreras
* 46 Neal Cotts
* 34 Freddy García
* 20 Jon Garland
* 32 Dustin Hermanson
* 26 Orlando Hernández
* 45 Bobby Jenks
* 43 Dámaso Marté
* 41 Brandon McCarthy
* 18 Cliff Politte
* 65 David Sanders
* 10 Shingo Takatsu
* 51 Luis Vizcaíno
* 58 Kevin Walker

Catchers
* 31 Raul Casanova
* 12 A. J. Pierzynski
* 36 Chris Widger

Infielders
* 27 Geoff Blum
* 27 Jamie Burke
* 24 Joe Crede
* 17 Ross Gload
* 1 Willie Harris
* 15 Tadahito Iguchi
* 14 Paul Konerko
* 62 Pedro López
* 38 Pablo Ozuna
* 5 Juan Uribe

Outfielders
* 44 Brian Anderson
* 25 Joe Borchard
* 23 Jermaine Dye
* 8 Carl Everett
* 7 Timo Pérez
* 22 Scott Podsednik
* 33 Aaron Rowand

Other batters
* 35 Frank Thomas

Manager
* 13 Ozzie Guillén

Coaches

* 3 Harold Baines (bench)
* 21 Don Cooper (pitching)
* 28 Joey Cora (third base)
* 53 Art Kusnyer (bullpen)
* 59 Man Soo Lee (bullpen catcher)
* 30 Tim Raines (first base)
* 29 Greg Walker (hitting)

1982 St. Louis Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals' 1982 season was the team's 101st season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 91st season in the National League. Making up for the previous year's near-miss, the Cardinals went 92-70 during the season and won their first-ever National League East Division title by three games over the Philadelphia Phillies. They defeated the National League West champion Atlanta Braves in three straight games to claim their first NL pennant since 1968. From there, they went on to win the World Series in seven games over the American League champion Milwaukee Brewers. It was the Cardinals' first World Championship since 1967, and their last until they opened the current Busch Stadium in 2006.

Opening Day lineup

* Lonnie Smith, CF
* Tom Herr, 2B
* Keith Hernandez, 1B
* Darrell Porter, C
* George Hendrick, RF
* Dane Iorg, LF
* Steve Braun, 3B
* Ozzie Smith, SS
* Bob Forsch, P

1982 St. Louis Cardinals roster
Roster
Pitchers
* 47 Joaquín Andújar
* 40 Doug Bair
* 31 Bob Forsch
* 36 Jim Kaat
* 44 Jeff Keener
* 32 Jeff Lahti
* 39 Dave LaPoint
* 34 Mark Littell
* 33 John Martin
* 38 Steve Mura
* 34 Eric Rasmussen
* 46 Andy Rincon
* 48 John Stuper
* 42 Bruce Sutter

Catchers
* 11 Glenn Brummer
* 15 Darrell Porter
* 23 Orlando Sánchez
* 18 Gene Tenace

Infielders
* 14 Julio González
* 37 Keith Hernandez
* 28 Tom Herr
* 10 Ken Oberkfell
* 35,12 Kelly Paris
* 5 Mike Ramsey
* 1 Ozzie Smith

Outfielders
* 26 Steve Braun
* 22 David Green
* 25 George Hendrick
* 19 Dane Iorg
* 21 Tito Landrum
* 51 Willie McGee
* 29 Gene Roof
* 27 Lonnie Smith
Manager
* 24 Whitey Herzog

Coaches

* 4 Chuck Hiller
* 9 Hub Kittle
* 8 Hal Lanier
* 3 Dave Ricketts
* 2 Red Schoendienst

Pos Player G AB H Avg. HR RBI
C Darrell Porter 120 373 86 .231 12 48
1B Keith Hernandez 160 579 173 .299 7 94
2B Tom Herr 135 493 131 .266 0 36
3B Ken Oberkfell 137 470 136 .289 2 34
SS Ozzie Smith 140 488 121 .248 2 43
LF Lonnie Smith 156 592 182 .307 8 69
CF Willie McGee 123 422 125 .296 4 56
RF George Hendrick 136 515 145 .282 19 104

Player G IP W L ERA SO
Joaquín Andújar 38 265.2 15 10 2.47 137
Bob Forsch 36 233 15 9 3.48 69
Steve Mura 35 184.1 12 11 4.05 84

Monday, February 20, 2012

MLB All-Time Homerun Leaders

Rank Player (yrs, age) Home Runs Bats
1. Barry Bonds (22) 762 L
2. Hank Aaron+ (23) 755 R
3. Babe Ruth+ (22) 714 L
4. Willie Mays+ (22) 660 R
5. Ken Griffey (22) 630 L
6. Alex Rodriguez (18, 35) 629 R
7. Sammy Sosa (18) 609 R
8. Jim Thome (21, 40) 604 L
9. Frank Robinson+ (21) 586 R
10. Mark McGwire (16) 583 R
11. Harmon Killebrew+ (22) 573 R
12. Rafael Palmeiro (20) 569 L
13. Reggie Jackson+ (21) 563 L
14. Manny Ramirez (19, 39) 555 R
15. Mike Schmidt+ (18) 548 R
16. Mickey Mantle+ (18) 536 B
17. Jimmie Foxx+ (20) 534 R
18. Willie McCovey+ (22) 521 L
Frank Thomas (19) 521 R
Ted Williams+ (19) 521 L
21. Ernie Banks+ (19) 512 R
Eddie Mathews+ (17) 512 L
23. Mel Ott+ (22) 511 L
24. Gary Sheffield (22) 509 R
25. Eddie Murray+ (21) 504 B
26. Lou Gehrig+ (17) 493 L
Fred McGriff (19) 493 L
28. Stan Musial+ (22) 475 L
Willie Stargell+ (21) 475 L
30. Carlos Delgado (17) 473 L
31. Dave Winfield+ (22) 465 R
32. Jose Canseco (17) 462 R
33. Chipper Jones (18, 39) 454 B
34. Carl Yastrzemski+ (23) 452 L
35. Jeff Bagwell (15) 449 R
Vladimir Guerrero (16, 36) 449 R
37. Albert Pujols (11, 31) 445 R
38. Dave Kingman (16) 442 R
39. Andre Dawson+ (21) 438 R
40. Juan Gonzalez (17) 434 R
41. Cal Ripken+ (21) 431 R
42. Jason Giambi (17, 40) 428 L
43. Mike Piazza (16) 427 R
44. Billy Williams+ (18) 426 L
45. Andruw Jones (16, 34) 420 R
46. Darrell Evans (21) 414 L
47. Duke Snider+ (18) 407 L
48. Andres Galarraga (19) 399 R
Al Kaline+ (22) 399 R
50. Dale Murphy (18) 398 R
51. Joe Carter (16) 396 R
Paul Konerko (15, 35) 396 R
53. Jim Edmonds (17) 393 L
54. Graig Nettles (22) 390 L
55. Johnny Bench+ (17) 389 R
56. Dwight Evans (20) 385 R
57. Harold Baines (22) 384 L
58. Larry Walker (17) 383 L
59. Frank Howard (16) 382 R
Jim Rice+ (16) 382 R
61. Albert Belle (12) 381 R
62. Orlando Cepeda+ (17) 379 R
Tony Perez+ (23) 379 R
64. David Ortiz (15, 35) 378 L
Matt Williams (17) 378 R
66. Norm Cash (17) 377 L
Jeff Kent (17) 377 R
68. Carlton Fisk+ (24) 376 R
69. Rocky Colavito (14) 374 R
70. Gil Hodges (18) 370 R
71. Ralph Kiner+ (10) 369 R
72. Adam Dunn (11, 31) 365 L
73. Joe DiMaggio+ (13) 361 R
74. Gary Gaetti (20) 360 R
75. Johnny Mize+ (15) 359 L
76. Lance Berkman (13, 35) 358 B
Yogi Berra+ (19) 358 L
78. Greg Vaughn (15) 355 R
79. Luis Gonzalez (19) 354 L
Lee May (18) 354 R
81. Ellis Burks (18) 352 R
82. Dick Allen (15) 351 R
83. Chili Davis (19) 350 B
84. Carlos Lee (13, 35) 349 R
85. George Foster (18) 348 R
86. Todd Helton (15, 37) 347 L
87. Ron Santo+ (15) 342 R
88. Jack Clark (18) 340 R
Alfonso Soriano (13, 35) 340 R
90. Tino Martinez (16) 339 L
Dave Parker (19) 339 L
Boog Powell (17) 339 L
93. Don Baylor (19) 338 R
94. Joe Adcock (17) 336 R
95. Darryl Strawberry (17) 335 L
96. Moises Alou (17) 332 R
Bobby Bonds (14) 332 R
98. Hank Greenberg+ (13) 331 R
Derrek Lee (15, 35) 331 R
100. Shawn Green (15) 328 L

2004–05 North Carolina Tar Heels Men's Basketball Team

The 2004–05 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball team represented University of North Carolina. The Head Coach was Roy Williams. The team played its home games at the Dean Smith Center in Chapel Hill, North Carolina, and was a member of the Atlantic Coast Conference.

2004–05 North Carolina Tar Heels men's basketball
NCAA Men's Division I Tournament, National Champions
Conference Atlantic Coast Conference
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #2
2004–05 record 33–4 (14–2 ACC)
Head coach Roy Williams
Assistant coach Joe Holladay
Assistant coach Steve Robinson
Assistant coach C. B. McGrath
Home arena Dean Smith Center

Name # Position Height Weight Year Home Town High School
Jesse Holley 0 Guard 6–3 190 Sophomore Roselle, NJ Abraham Clark
Melvin Scott 1 Guard 6–2 190 Senior Baltimore, MD Southern
Raymond Felton 2 Guard 6–1 198 Junior Latta, SC Latta
Reyshawn Terry 3 Forward 6–8 214 Sophomore Winston-Salem, NC R. J. Reynolds
Jackie Manuel 5 Guard/Forward 6–5 189 Senior West Palm Beach, FL Cardinal Newman
Quentin Thomas 11 Guard 6–3 175 Freshman Oakland, CA Oakland Technical Senior
Jawad Williams 21 Forward 6–9 218 Senior Cleveland, OH St. Edward
Wes Miller 22 Guard 5–11 185 Sophomore Charlotte, NC New Hampton Prep (N. H.)
Marvin Williams 24 Forward 6–9 230 Freshman Bremerton, WA Bremerton
Damion Grant 25 Center 6–11 267 Junior Portland, Jamaica Brewster Academy (N. H.)
Rashad McCants 32 Forward/Guard 6–4 207 Junior Asheville, NC New Hampton Prep (N. H.)
David Noel 34 Forward 6–6 224 Junior Durham, NC Southern Durham
C. J. Hooker 35 Guard 6–2 188 Senior Palmer, AK Palmer
Byron Sanders 41 Forward 6–9 230 Junior Gulfport, MS Harrison Central
Sean May 42 Forward/Center 6–9 266 Junior Bloomington, IN Bloomington North

2006 Detroit Tigers

The 2006 Detroit Tigers won the American League Pennant. They represented the AL in the World Series before falling to the St. Louis Cardinals 4 games to 1. The season was their 106th since they entered the AL in 1901.

There were many memorable moments during the regular season. Some of the highlights:

* On April 16, Chris Shelton became the fastest player to eight home runs in American League history, and the Tigers won a 1-0 game behind a sparkling three-hitter by Mike Maroth and one-hit relief by Joel Zumaya and Fernando Rodney.

* On April 20, the Tigers came into the ninth down 3-1, but clutch hits tied the game, and Brandon Inge's resolute 15-pitch walk (Jim Leyland called it a "1½ Marlboro" at-bat, in reference to his noted chain-smoking when in the dugout) forced in the winning run.

* On May 3, in the eighth inning of a tense pitching duel, Brandon Inge beat a throw to second to avoid a double play, then Alexis Gómez singled him in for a 2-1 comeback victory.

* On May 20, Cincinnati's Ken Griffey, Jr. hit a grand slam that put the Reds up, 6-5, but with two outs in the ninth inning, Curtis Granderson hit a home run that tied the game, and the Tigers won in extra innings.

* On June 1, hits by Ivan Rodríguez and Magglio Ordóñez (and gum-chewing by Nate Robertson) set up Carlos Guillén's game-winning ("walk-off") single, completing a five-run comeback and defeating the Yankees.

* On June 18, Kenny Rogers won his 200th game, becoming only the 26th left-hander in baseball history to do so.

* On June 27, Roger Clemens hurled a three-hitter, but Nate Robertson outpitched him and the Tigers won, 4-0.

* On July 11, the 2006 All-Star Game featured three Tigers—Rodríguez, Kenny Rogers and Ordóñez—for the first time since 1987. Rodríguez was voted as a starter, while Rogers was named the starting pitcher. The battery combination of Rogers and Rodríguez was the first time a Tigers pitcher threw to a Tigers catcher to start the Mid-Summer Classic since Denny McLain threw to Bill Freehan in 1966.

* On July 14, in a tie game, with two out and two on in the top of the ninth, reliever Todd Jones faced dangerous slugger Mark Teahen, who had already hit two home runs in the game. Jones threw Teahen every pitch he could, and Teahen repeatedly fouled each pitch off. Finally Jim Leyland walked to the mound—where he told Jones his visit was a ruse, designed to fool Teahen into thinking Jones would be throwing anything but a fastball. Leyland walked off the field, Jones threw a fastball, and Teahen swung and missed for strike three. Then, in the bottom of the ninth, Carlos Guillén hit the Tigers' first walk-off home run of the season for the victory. After the game, Jones said of Leyland's visit to the mound: "I thought, ‘Wow, you’re a really good manager.’"

* On July 19, Craig Monroe hit a grand slam in a Tigers victory over the Chicago White Sox.

* On July 20 , the Tigers essentially beat the White Sox on a Marcus Thames slide into second. The slide broke up a seemingly sure double play, which allowed the winning run to score later that inning.

* On July 24, the Tigers became the first team since the 1891 St. Louis Cardinals to score 5 runs or more in the first inning in three consecutive games.

* On July 28, the Tigers weathered 12 strikeouts by rookie Twins phenom Francisco Liriano, and won another tight game with a 10th-inning single by Craig Monroe.

* On August 1, Carlos Guillén hit for the cycle, becoming the first Tiger since Damion Easley did it in 2001, and the third since 1950, to do so.

* On August 5, Iván Rodríguez hit a walk-off home run with two outs in the ninth inning to complete a comeback against the Cleveland Indians.

* On August 27, a 7-1 victory over the Cleveland Indians secured the Tigers an 82nd victory—and their first winning season since 1993.

* On August 30, with two outs in the top of the ninth, Craig Monroe blasted a dramatic three-run home run, erasing a one-run deficit, stunning the crowd at Yankee Stadium, and giving the Tigers a 5-3 come-from-behind victory over the Yankees.

* On September 12, Craig Monroe tied a club record with three outfield assists, including throwing two runners out at the plate, and Carlos Guillén slugged two home runs, one from each side of the plate, the second being a walk-off in the bottom of the ninth that won the game, 3-2, over the Texas Rangers.

* On September 23, the Tigers scored ten runs in the first inning in a 15-4 victory over the Kansas City Royals. The game marked Plácido Polanco's return from the disabled list; he had three hits.

* On September 24, the Tigers scored nine runs in the second inning en route to a 11-4 victory. The win secured their first playoff appearance since 1987

2006 Detroit Tigers
Roster
Pitchers

* 38 Jeremy Bonderman
* 43 Román Colón
* 52 Chad Durbin
* 49 Jason Grilli
* 59 Todd Jones
* 41 Wilfredo Ledezma
* 36 Colby Lewis
* 46 Mike Maroth
* 50 Andrew Miller
* 31 Zach Miner
* 29 Nate Robertson
* 56 Fernando Rodney
* 37 Kenny Rogers
* 44 Bobby Seay
* 48 Chris Spurling
* 53 Jordan Tata
* 35 Justin Verlander
* 32 Jamie Walker
* 54 Joel Zumaya

Catchers
* 7 Iván Rodríguez
* 13 Vance Wilson

Infielders
* 21 Sean Casey
* 9 Carlos Guillén
* 36 Jack Hannahan
* 19 Kevin Hooper
* 20 Omar Infante
* 15 Brandon Inge
* 8 Neifi Pérez
* 14 Plácido Polanco
* 39 Ramón Santiago
* 26 Chris Shelton
* 25 Dmitri Young

Outfielders
* 24 Brent Clevlen
* 43 Alexis Gómez
* 28 Curtis Granderson
* 27 Craig Monroe
* 30 Magglio Ordóñez
* 33 Marcus Thames

Other batters
* 58 Mike Rabelo
* 25 Matt Stairs

Manager
* 10 Jim Leyland

Coaches

* 17 Rafael Belliard (infield)
* 55 Chuck Hernandez (pitching)
* 22 Gene Lamont (third base)
* 21 Lloyd McClendon (bullpen)
* 34 Don Slaught (hitting)
* 18 Andy Van Slyke (first base)

1983 Baltimore Orioles

The 1983 Baltimore Orioles season was a season in American baseball. It involved the Orioles finishing 1st in the American League East with a record of 98 wins and 64 losses. The season culminated with the winning of the 1983 World Series over the Philadelphia Phillies.

Opening Day starters

* Rich Dauer
* Rick Dempsey
* Dan Ford
* Leo Hernández
* Dennis Martínez
* Eddie Murray
* Cal Ripken, Jr.
* Gary Roenicke
* John Shelby
* Ken Singleton

1983 Baltimore Orioles roster
Roster
Pitchers

* 52 Mike Boddicker
* 34 Storm Davis
* 46 Mike Flanagan
* 30 Dennis Martínez
* 23 Tippy Martinez
* 16 Scott McGregor
* 39 Paul Mirabella
* 21 Dan Morogiello
* 22 Jim Palmer
* 36 Allan Ramirez
* 53 Sammy Stewart
* 49 Tim Stoddard
* 32 Bill Swaggerty
* 51 Don Welchel

Catchers
* 24 Rick Dempsey
* 18 Dave Huppert
* 17 Joe Nolan
* 9 John Stefero

Infielders
* 2 Bobby Bonner
* 10 Todd Cruz
* 25 Rich Dauer
* 11 Glenn Gulliver
* 3 Leo Hernandez
* 33 Eddie Murray
* 8 Cal Ripken, Jr.
* 6 Aurelio Rodríguez
* 12 Lenn Sakata

Outfielders
* 27 Benny Ayala
* 1 Al Bumbry
* 28 Jim Dwyer
* 15 Dan Ford
* 39 Tito Landrum
* 38 John Lowenstein
* 35 Gary Roenicke
* 37 John Shelby
* 43 Mike Young

Other batters
* 29 Ken Singleton

Manager
* 26 Joe Altobelli

Coaches
* 44 Elrod Hendricks
* 31 Ray Miller
* 47 Cal Ripken, Sr.
* 54 Ralph Rowe
* 40 Jimmy Williams

Pos Player G AB R H Avg. HR RBI SB
C Rick Dempsey 128 347 33 80 .231 4 32 1
1B Eddie Murray 156 582 115 178 .306 33 111 5
2B Rich Dauer 140 459 49 108 .235 5 41 1
3B Todd Cruz 81 221 16 46 .208 3 27 3
SS Cal Ripken 162 663 121 211 .318 27 102 0
LF John Lowenstein 122 310 52 87 .281 15 60 2
CF Al Bumbry 124 378 63 104 .275 3 31 12
RF Dan Ford 103 407 63 114 .280 9 55 9
DH Ken Singleton 151 507 52 140 .276 18 84 0

Player G IP W L ERA BB SO
Scott McGregor 36 260 18 7 3.18 45 86
Storm Davis 34 200.1 13 7 3.59 64 125
Dennis Martínez 32 153 7 16 5.53 45 71
Mike Boddicker 27 179 16 8 2.77 52 120
Mike Flanagan 20 125.1 12 4 3.30 31 50
Jim Palmer 14 76.2 5 4 4.23 19 34
Allan Ramirez 11 57 4 4 3.47 30 20

Sunday, February 19, 2012

2005–06 Florida Gators Men's Basketball Team

The 2005–06 Florida Gators men's basketball team represented the University of Florida in the sport of basketball during the 2005–06 college basketball season. The Gators competed in Division I of the National Collegiate Athletic Association (NCAA) and the Eastern Division of the Southeastern Conference (SEC). They were led by head coach Billy Donovan, and played their home games in the O'Connell Center on the university's Gainesville, Florida campus.

The Gators started the season looking to end their recent steak of losing in the first two rounds of the NCAA Tournament. They finished the season with a 24–6 record entering the SEC Championship. They won all three games and received a No. 3 seed in the NCAA Tournament, eventually playing in the final against UCLA. On April 3, 2006 Florida beat UCLA 73–57 to win their first ever NCAA Championship

2005–06 Florida Gators men's basketball
National Champions
SEC Tournament Champions
NCAA Men's Division I Tournament
Championship Game, W 73–57 v. UCLA
Conference Southeastern Conference East
Ranking
Coaches #1
AP #11
2005–06 record 33–6 (10–6 SEC)
Head coach Billy Donovan
Assistant coach Anthony Grant
Donnie Jones
Larry Shyatt
Home arena O'Connell Center

Name Number Position Height Weight Class Hometown
Jack Berry 22 G 6–6 215 Sophomore Windermere, Florida
Corey Brewer 2 F 6–9 185 Sophomore Portland, Tennessee
Taurean Green 11 G 6–0 177 Sophomore Ft. Lauderdale, Florida
Walter Hodge 15 G 6–0 170 Freshman Guaynabo, Puerto Rico
Al Horford 42 F/C 6–10 245 Sophomore Grand Ledge, Michigan
David Huertas 33 G 6–5 185 Freshman Humacao, Puerto Rico
Lee Humphrey 12 G 6–2 192 Junior Maryville, Tennessee
Adrian Moss 4 F 6–9 247 Senior Houston, Texas
Joakim Noah 13 F/C 6–11 230 Sophomore New York, New York
Chris Richard 32 F/C 6–9 255 Junior Lakeland, Florida
Jimmie Sutton 5 F/C 6–10 252 Freshman Deerfield Beach, Florida
Brett Swanson 1 G 6–2 180 Junior Pace, Florida
Garrett Tyler 25 G/F 6–7 200 Sophomore Palm Harbor, Florida

2009–10 Los Angeles Lakers

The 2009–10 Los Angeles Lakers season is the 64th season of the franchise, 62nd in the National Basketball Association (NBA) and 50th in Los Angeles. Coming off a championship in 2009, the Lakers successfully defended their title. They spent the most money of any team on player salaries this season, totaling $112.7 million ($91.3 million on player salaries and $21.4 million on luxury tax). The Lakers once again sold out all 41 home games for the season at Staples Center.

The Lakers clinched the Pacific Division for the 31st time in franchise history. Despite winning eight games less than the previous season, they still held the top seed in the Western Conference playoffs and made it to the NBA Finals for the third straight season. In the 2010 NBA Finals the Lakers defeated the Boston Celtics in a rematch of the 2008 NBA Finals won by the Celtics. This time, the Lakers won the series 4-3 for their 16th NBA title and handed Boston its first Game 7 loss in an NBA Finals in team history. Kobe Bryant won his second consecutive NBA Finals MVP.

On July 14, 2009, Phil Jackson won the 2010 ESPY Awards for Best Coach/Manager while Kobe Bryant won for Best NBA Player.

Los Angeles Lakers roster
Players Coaches
Pos. # Name From
G/F 37 USA Artest, Ron St. John's
G 12 USA Brown, Shannon Michigan State
G/F 24 USA Bryant, Kobe (C) Lower Merion HS (PA)
C 17 USA Bynum, Andrew St. Joseph HS (NJ)
G 1 USA Farmar, Jordan UCLA
G 2 USA Fisher, Derek Arkansas-Little Rock
F/C 16 Spain Gasol, Pau Spain
C 28 Belgium Mbenga, D. J. DR Congo
F 6 USA Morrison, Adam (IN) Gonzaga
F 7 USA Odom, Lamar Rhode Island
F/C 21 USA Powell, Josh North Carolina State
G 18 Slovenia Vujačić, Sasha Slovenia
F 4 USA Walton, Luke Arizona


Head coach
* United States Phil Jackson (North Dakota)

Assistant coach(es)
* United States Frank Hamblen (Syracuse)
* United States Brian Shaw (UC Santa Barbara)
* United States Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (UCLA)
* United States Craig Hodges (Long Beach State)
* United States Jim Cleamons (Ohio State)

Athletic trainer(s)
* United States Gary Vitti (Southern Connecticut State)

2006 St. Louis Cardinals

The St. Louis Cardinals 2006 season was the team's 125th season in St. Louis, Missouri and the 115th season in the National League. The season started out with a bang, as the team raced out to a 31-16 record by late May. Momentum would be slowed by injuries, as starting pitcher Mark Mulder was lost for the year, while center fielder Jim Edmonds and shortstop David Eckstein missed large amounts of playing time in the second half. Poor performance from several key players also hampered the team: starting pitcher Jason Marquis compiled a 6.02 ERA, starting pitcher Sidney Ponson was cut due to ineffectiveness, closer Jason Isringhausen blew ten saves before undergoing season-ending hip surgery in September, and catcher Yadier Molina had a poor offensive year, batting .216.

All this led to a difficult that quick start, one that included two eight-game losing streaks (the longest such streaks for the franchise since 1988) and a seven-game losing streak, losing months in June, August and September, and an 83-78 record, the worst for the Cardinals since the 1999 team finished 75-86. However, that record was good enough to finish first in a weak National League Central division, edging the second-place Houston Astros by a game and a half, and the Cardinals made the playoffs for the sixth time in the last seven seasons. Once the playoffs began, the lightly regarded Cardinals surprised baseball fans everywhere by beating the San Diego Padres in the Division Series, beating the New York Mets in the NLCS, and beating the Detroit Tigers in the 2006 World Series four games to one, winning the tenth, and probably most unlikely, World Series championship in franchise history.

Following the season, the Cardinals ended a 19-year association with KPLR and returned to KSDK-NBC Channel 5 for the first time since 1987.

2006 St. Louis Cardinals
Roster
Pitchers

* 29 Chris Carpenter
* 40 Brian Falkenborg
* 34 Randy Flores
* 32 Josh Hancock
* 44 Jason Isringhausen
* 61 Tyler Johnson
* 52 Josh Kinney
* 41 Braden Looper
* 21 Jason Marquis
* 30 Mark Mulder
* 60 Chris Narveson
* 13 Sidney Ponson
* 23 Anthony Reyes
* 73 Ricardo Rincón
* 31 Jorge Sosa
* 37 Jeff Suppan
* 48 Brad Thompson
* 60,50 Adam Wainwright
* 36 Jeff Weaver

Catchers
* 28 Gary Bennett
* 4 Yadier Molina
* 46 Mike Rose

Infielders
* 7 Ronnie Belliard
* 22 David Eckstein
* 12 Aaron Miles
* 62 John Nelson
* 5 Albert Pujols
* 27 Scott Rolen
* 26 Scott Spiezio
* 35,13 José Vizcaíno

Outfielders
* 33 Larry Bigbie
* 16 Chris Duncan
* 15 Jim Edmonds
* 43 Juan Encarnación
* 31 John Gall
* 19 Timo Pérez
* 53 John Rodriguez
* 55 Skip Schumaker
* 99 So Taguchi
* 3 Preston Wilson

Manager
* 10 Tony LaRussa

Coaches
* 18 Dave Duncan (pitching)
* 38 Marty Mason (bullpen)
* 39 Dave McKay (first base)
* 8 Hal McRae (hitting)
* 11 José Oquendo (third base)
* 24 Joe Pettini (bench)