Sunday, April 22, 2012

1995-96 Chicago Bulls

In the 1995–96 season, the Chicago Bulls set an NBA record by becoming the first team to win 70 regular season games. They finished the season with a record of 72–10 and would go on to defeat the Seattle SuperSonics in the 1996 NBA Finals.

Prior the 1995–96 NBA season, Dennis Rodman and Jack Haley were traded from the Spurs to the Bulls for Will Perdue and cash considerations to fill a large void at power forward left by Horace Grant, who left the Bulls prior to the 1994–95 NBA season.

Haley only played in 1 game during the regular season and didn't participate in the playoffs. He was best known for his friendship with the enigmatic Rodman.

In his book Bad as I Wanna Be, Rodman stated that Michael Jordan and Scottie Pippen had to approve the trade before it took place. Rodman chose the number 91 (9+1=10 according to Rodman for why he chose that number) for his jersey since #10 was retired by the Bulls in 1995 in honor of Bob Love.

Pos. # Nat. Name Ht. Wt. From
PG 0 Brown, Randy 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 190 lb (86 kg) New Mexico State
SG 30 Buechler, Jud 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Arizona
PF 35 Caffey, Jason 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 255 lb (116 kg) Alabama
C 53 Edwards, James 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 225 lb (102 kg) Washington
PF 54 Haley, Jack 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 240 lb (109 kg) UCLA
SG 9 Harper, Ron 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Miami (OH)
SG 23 Jordan, Michael (C) 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 215 lb (98 kg) North Carolina
PG 25 Kerr, Steve 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 175 lb (79 kg) Arizona
SF 7 Kukoc, Toni 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Croatia
C 13 Longley, Luc 7 ft 2 in (2.18 m) 265 lb (120 kg) New Mexico
SF 33 Pippen, Scottie (C) 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 218 lb (99 kg) Central Arkansas
PF 91 Rodman, Dennis 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 220 lb (100 kg) SE Oklahoma State
C 22 Salley, John 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 230 lb (104 kg) Georgia Tech
PF 8 Simpkins, Dickey 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 248 lb (112 kg) Providence
C 34 Wennington, Bill 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 245 lb (111 kg) St. John's


Head coach

Phil Jackson (North Dakota)

Assistant coach(es)

Jim Cleamons (Ohio State)
Jim Rodgers (Iowa)
John Paxson (Notre Dame)
Tex Winter (Southern California)

Michael Jordan, Scottie Pippen, and Dennis Rodman led Chicago to the NBA Finals as the Bulls had a historic run. The Bulls finished 72–10 in the regular season to break the 1971–72 Lakers' record of 69 wins in a season. In his first full season since returning to the NBA, Jordan won his eighth scoring title to break Wilt Chamberlain's record of seven and also came away with a triple crown of awards: the MVP awards for the regular season, All-Star Game and NBA Finals. The Bulls improved 25 games from the previous year's 47–35 record to their all-time record 72 regular season wins. In addition, they would go on to set another regular season landmark by becoming the fastest team to 41 wins; by going 41–3 before losing their 4th game that year, which was also a record once held by the 1971–72 Los Angeles Lakers, who got off to a 39–3 start. They would win 33 road games, setting yet another NBA record. They also had a 39–2 home record, which was one win shy of tying the Boston Celtics for best home record in history. For these reasons, many fans and media members regard the 1995–96 Chicago Bulls to be the greatest NBA team of all time.

Later, in the playoffs, the Bulls easily made their way to the NBA Finals and the NBA championship. Rodman, Jordan, and Scottie Pippen all made the All-Defensive First Team, the first time three players from the same team made it on the first team. Rodman led the league in rebounding for the fifth straight year, and Jordan won the scoring title, the second time that teammates had led the league in scoring and rebounding.

Saturday, April 21, 2012

1986-87 Los Angeles Lakers

1986–87 Los Angeles Lakers season
Tenth NBA Championship
Head coach Pat Riley
Owner(s) Jerry Buss
Arena The Forum
Results
Record 65–17 (.793)
Place Division: 1st (Pacific)
Conference: 1st (Western)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television Prime Ticket, KHJ
Radio AM 570 KLAC
Los Angeles Lakers seasons

The highlight of the Los Angeles Lakers season was winning the NBA title over the defending champions, the Boston Celtics.

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Brady Lynch Mychal Thompson Mike Smrek
PF A. C. Green Kurt Rambis
SF James Worthy Billy Thompson Adrian Branch
SG Byron Scott Michael Cooper
PG Magic Johnson Wes Matthews

Player GP MPG REB AST STL BLK PTS PPG
Magic Johnson 80 36.3 504 977 138 36 1909 23.9
James Worthy 82 34.4 466 226 108 83 1594 19.4
Byron Scott 82 33.3 286 281 125 18 1397 17.0
Kareem Abdul-Jabbar 78 31.3 523 203 49 97 1366 17.5
Michael Cooper 82 27.5 254 373 78 43 859 10.5
A.C. Green 79 28.4 615 84 70 80 852 10.8
Kurt Rambis 78 19.4 453 63 74 41 446 5.7
Mychal Thompson 33 20.6 136 28 14 30 333 10.1
Billy Thompson 59 12.9 171 60 15 30 332 5.6
Wes Matthews 50 10.6 47 100 23 4 208 4.2
Frank Brickowski 37 10.9 97 12 14 4 146 3.9
Adrian Branch 32 6.8 53 16 16 3 138 4.3
Mike Smrek 35 6.7 37 5 4 13 76 2.2

Magic Johnson, NBA Most Valuable Player
Magic Johnson, NBA Finals Most Valuable Player

Friday, April 20, 2012

1985-86 Boston Celtics

1985–86 Boston Celtics season
Sixteenth NBA Championship
Head coach K. C. Jones
Owner(s) Don Gaston, Alan Cohen, Paul Dupee
Arena Boston Garden
Hartford Civic Center
Results
Record 67–15 (.817)
Place Division: 1st (Atlantic)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television SportsChannel New England, WLVI, WTXX
Radio WRKO, WTIC

In 1985-86 the Celtics fielded one of the best teams in NBA history. The 1986 Celtics won 67 games, going 40-1 at home (37-1 at the Boston Garden, 3-0 at the Hartford Civic Center). Bird won his third consecutive MVP award after having arguably his finest season, and Walton won the Sixth Man of the Year Award. They would win their 16th championship and last for 22 years, defeating the Houston Rockets in 6 games in the NBA Finals.

The 1985 NBA Draft took place on June 18, 1985. It was also the first NBA Draft of the "Lottery" era. The lottery was put into place so teams could not intentionally lose games to receive the number one pick.
Round Pick Player Position Nationality School/Club Team
1 20 Sam Vincent Guard United States Michigan State
3 70 Andre Battle Guard United States Loyola (IL)
4 93 Cliff Webber Forward United States Liberty Baptist
5 116 Albert Butts Forward United States La Salle
6 139 Ralph Lewis Guard United States La Salle
7 162 Chris Remly United States Rutgers

Player GP REB AST STL BLK PTS AVG
Larry Bird 82 805 557 166 51 2115 25.8
Kevin McHale 68 551 181 29 164 1448 21.3
Robert Parish 81 770 145 65 116 1305 16.1
Dennis Johnson 78 268 456 110 35 1213 15.6
Danny Ainge 80 235 405 94 7 855 10.7
Scott Wedman 79 192 82 38 22 634 8.0
Bill Walton 80 544 165 38 106 606 7.6
Jerry Sichting 82 104 188 50 0 537 6.5
David Thirdkill 49 70 15 11 3 163 3.3
Sam Vincent 57 48 69 17 4 184 3.2
Sly Williams 6 15 2 1 1 17 2.8
Rick Carlisle 77 77 104 19 4 199 2.6
Greg Kite 64 128 17 3 28 83 1.3

Pos. # Name Height Weight DOB (Y–M–D) From
G/F 44 Ainge, Danny 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) 175 lb (79 kg) Brigham Young
F 33 Bird, Larry (C) 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Indiana State University
G 34 Carlisle, Rick 6 ft 5 in (1.96 m) 210 lb (95 kg) Virginia
G 3 Johnson, Dennis 6 ft 4 in (1.93 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Pepperdine
C 50 Kite, Greg 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 250 lb (113 kg) 1961–08–05 Brigham Young
F/C 32 McHale, Kevin 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 210 lb (95 kg) 1957–12–19 Minnesota
C 00 Parish, Robert 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 230 lb (104 kg) Centenary College of Louisiana
G 12 Sichting, Jerry 6 ft 1 in (1.85 m) 168 lb (76 kg) Purdue
F 45 Thirdkill, David 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 195 lb (88 kg) Bradley
G 11 Vincent, Sam 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Michigan State
C 5 Walton, Bill 6 ft 11 in (2.11 m) 235 lb (107 kg) UCLA
G 8 Wedman, Scott 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 215 lb (98 kg) Colorado
G/F 35 Williams, Sly 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 210 lb (95 kg) Rhode Island


Head coach

K.C. Jones (San Francisco)

Assistant coach(es)

Jimmy Rodgers (Ohio State)
Chris Ford (Villanova)

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Robert Parish Bill Walton Greg Kite
PF Kevin McHale
SF Larry Bird David Thirdkill
SG Danny Ainge Scott Wedman Rick Carlisle
PG Dennis Johnson Jerry Sichting Sam Vincent

Thursday, April 19, 2012

1971-72 Los Angeles Lakers

1971–72 Los Angeles Lakers season
Sixth NBA Championship
Head coach Bill Sharman
Owner(s) Jack Kent Cooke
Arena The Forum
Results
Record 69–13 (.841)
Place Division: 1st (Pacific)
Conference: 1st (Western)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television KTLA
Radio KABC

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Wilt Chamberlain LeRoy Ellis
PF Happy Hairston John Trapp
SF Jim McMillian Pat Riley Keith Erickson
SG Jerry West Jim Cleamons
PG Gail Goodrich Flynn Robinson

Player GP MPG FG% FT% RPG APG PPG
Elgin Baylor 9 26.6 .433 .815 6.3 2.0 11.8
Wilt Chamberlain 82 42.3 .649 .422 19.2 4.0 14.8
Jim Cleamons 38 5.3 .350 .778 1.0 0.9 2.6
LeRoy Ellis 74 14.6 .460 .695 4.2 0.6 4.6
Keith Erickson 15 17.5 .482 .857 2.6 2.3 5.7
Gail Goodrich 82 37.1 .487 .850 3.6 4.5 25.9
Happy Hairston 80 34.4 .461 .779 13.1 2.4 13.1
Jim McMillian 80 38.1 .482 .791 6.5 2.6 18.8
Pat Riley 67 13.8 .447 .743 1.9 1.1 6.7
Flynn Robinson 64 15.7 .490 .860 1.8 2.2 9.9
John Trapp 58 13.1 .443 .699 3.1 0.7 5.7
Jerry West 77 38.6 .477 .814 4.2 9.7 25.8

Game 1

Although without Willis Reed because of his knee injury. Jerry Lucas scored 26 points but was only one of several Knicks who was red hot. Bill Bradley hit 11 of 12 shots from the field as New York shot 53 percent for the game. The team took advantage of a nearly perfect first half to jump to a good lead and won easily, 114-92. Early in the second half, the Forum crowd began filing out dejectedly. It looked like another Los Angeles fold in the Finals.

Game 2

Knicks forward Dave DeBusschere hurt his side and didn't play after the first half. Hairston scored 12 points in the second half, and Los Angeles evened the series with a 106-92 win.

Game 3

DeBusschere attempted to play in the first half and missed all six of his field-goal attempts. He was hurting and elected not to play in the second half. DeBusschere explained :"I didn't feel I was helping the team,". The Lakers danced out to a 22-point lead and regained the home-court advantage with a 107-96 win.

Game 4

The game went into overtime, but at the end of regulation, Wilt Chamberlain picked up his fifth foul. In 13 NBA seasons, he had never fouled out of a game, a statistic of which he was immensely proud. Immediately speculation started along press row that he would play soft in the overtime. Instead, he came out in a shotblocking fury that propelled the Lakers to a 116-111 win. At three games to one, their lead now seemed insurmountable.

Game 5

The Lakers won their sixth NBA championship by the score of 114-100. This was their first championship since moving to Los Angeles in 1960. Jerry West also won his first NBA championship after 12 years of waiting. Wilt Chamberlain scored 24 points and 29 rebounds and earned the NBA Finals MVP Award.

Award winners

Bill Sharman, NBA Coach of the Year
Jerry West, All-NBA First Team
Jerry West, All-NBA Defensive First Team
Wilt Chamberlain, All-NBA Defensive First Team
Wilt Chamberlain, NBA Leader, Shooting Percentage (.649

Wednesday, April 18, 2012

1988-89 Detroit Pistons

1988–89 Detroit Pistons season
First NBA Championship
Head coach Chuck Daly
Owner(s) William Davidson
Arena The Palace of Auburn Hills
Results
Record 63–19 (.768)
Place Division: 1st (Central)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television PASS Sports, WKBD
Radio WCXI

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Bill Laimbeer James Edwards
PF Rick Mahorn John Salley
SF Mark Aguirre Dennis Rodman Fennis Dembo
SG Joe Dumars Vinnie Johnson John Long
PG Isiah Thomas Micheal Williams

Player GP GS MPG FG% 3P% FT% RPG APG SPG BPG PPG
Mark Aguirre 36 32 29.7 .483 .293 .738 4.2 2.5 .44 .19 15.5
Adrian Dantley 42 42 31.9 .521 .000 .839 3.9 2.2 .55 .14 18.4
Darryl Dawkins 14 0 3.4 .474 .000 .500 .5 .1 .00 .07 1.9
Fennis Dembo 31 0 2.4 .333 .000 .800 .7 .2 .03 .00 1.2
Joe Dumars 69 67 34.9 .505 .483 .850 2.5 5.7 .91 .07 17.2
James Edwards 76 1 16.5 .500 .000 .686 3.0 .6 .14 .41 7.3
Steve Harris 3 0 2.3 .250 .000 1.000 .7 .0 .33 .00 1.3
Vinnie Johnson 82 21 25.3 .464 .295 .734 3.1 3.0 .90 .21 13.8
Bill Laimbeer 81 81 32.6 .499 .349 .840 9.6 2.2 .63 1.23 13.7
John Long 24 1 6.3 .475 .000 .846 .5 .6 .00 .08 2.0
Rick Mahorn 72 61 24.9 .517 .000 .748 6.9 .8 .56 .92 7.2
Pace Mannion 5 0 2.8 1.000 .000 .000 .6 .0 .20 .00 .8
Dennis Rodman 82 8 26.9 .595 .231 .626 9.4 1.2 .67 .93 9.0
Jim Rowinski 6 0 1.3 .000 .000 1.000 .3 .0 .00 .00 .7
John Salley 67 21 21.8 .498 .000 .692 5.0 1.1 .60 1.07 7.0
Isiah Thomas 80 76 36.6 .464 .273 .818 3.4 8.3 1.66 .25 18.2
Micheal Williams 49 0 7.3 .364 .222 .660 .6 1.4 .27 .06 2.6

Joe Dumars, NBA Finals Most Valuable Player

Tuesday, April 17, 2012

1996-97 Chicago Bulls

1996–97 Chicago Bulls season
Fifth NBA Championship
Head coach Phil Jackson
Owner(s) Jerry Reinsdorf
Arena United Center
Results
Record 69–13 (.841)
Place Division: 1st (Central)
Conference: 1st (Eastern)
Playoff finish NBA Champions
Local media
Television SportsChannel Chicago, WGN
Radio WMVP
The Chicago Bulls repeated as NBA World Champions. The Bulls would go on to beat the Utah Jazz in the 1997 NBA Finals. The team was led by Michael Jordan, rebound ace Dennis Rodman and perennial all star small forward Scottie Pippen. Other notable players on the club's roster that year were clutch-specialist Croatian Toni Kukoc, and sharp-shooting point guard Steve Kerr. The Bulls finished with a 69-13 record, just missing out on becoming the first team in NBA history to have back-to-back 70 wins seasons.

Pos. # Nat. Name Ht. Wt. From
PG 1 Brown, Randy 6 ft 2 in (1.88 m) 190 lb (86 kg) New Mexico State
SG 30 Buechler, Jud 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Arizona
PF 35 Caffey, Jason 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 255 lb (116 kg) Alabama
SG 9 Harper, Ron 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 185 lb (84 kg) Miami (OH)
SG 23 Jordan, Michael 6 ft 6 in (1.98 m) 215 lb (98 kg) North Carolina
PG 25 Kerr, Steve 6 ft 3 in (1.91 m) 175 lb (79 kg) Arizona
SF 7 Kukoc, Toni 6 ft 10 in (2.08 m) 192 lb (87 kg) Croatia
C 13 Longley, Luc 7 ft 2 in (2.18 m) 265 lb (120 kg) New Mexico
C 00 Parish, Robert 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 235 lb (107 kg) Centenary
SF 33 Pippen, Scottie 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 220 lb (100 kg) Central Arkansas
PF 91 Rodman, Dennis 6 ft 8 in (2.03 m) 210 lb (95 kg) SE Oklahoma State
PF 8 Simpkins, Dickey 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 248 lb (112 kg) Providence
SF 6 Steigenga, Matt 6 ft 7 in (2.01 m) 225 lb (102 kg) Michigan State
C 34 Wennington, Bill 7 ft 0 in (2.13 m) 245 lb (111 kg) St. John's
C 18 Williams, Brian 6 ft 9 in (2.06 m) 235 lb (107 kg) Arizona


Head coach

Phil Jackson (North Dakota)

Assistant coach(es)

Bill Cartwright (San Francisco)
Frank Hamblen (Syracuse)
Jim Rodgers (Iowa)
Tex Winter (Southern California)

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Luc Longley Brian Williams Robert Parish Bill Wennington
PF Dennis Rodman Jason Caffey Dickey Simpkins
SF Scottie Pippen Toni Kuko─Ź
SG Michael Jordan Jud Buechler
PG Ron Harper Steve Kerr Randy Brown

Monday, April 16, 2012

1970-71 Milwaukee Bucks

970–71 Milwaukee Bucks season
First NBA championship
Head coach Larry Costello
Arena Milwaukee Arena
Results
Record 66–16 (.805)
Place Division: 1st (Midwest)
Conference: 1st (Western)
Playoff finish NBA champions

The 1970–71 Milwaukee Bucks season was the third season for the Bucks. Milwaukee posted a 66–16 record in only its third year of existence, and its second since getting Kareem Abdul-Jabbar. A big part of the championship season was the acquisition of "The Big O", Oscar Robertson. Other role players on the Bucks included players such as Bob Dandridge (18.4 ppg) and Jon McGlocklin (15.8 ppg), power forward Greg Smith and key reserves Lucius Allen, Bob Boozer and Dick Cunningham completing the nucleus.

Pos. Starter Bench Reserve Inactive
C Lew Alcindor Dick Cunningham
PF Greg Smith Bob Boozer McCoy McLemore
SF Bob Dandridge Bob Greacen
SG Jon McGlocklin Jeff Webb
PG Oscar Robertson Lucius Allen Marv Winkler

In only his second pro season, Kareem Abdul-Jabbar (then known as Lew Alcindor) led the league in scoring at 31.7 ppg, ranked second in field goal percentage at .577 and fourth in rebounding at 16.0 rpg. Newly arrived Oscar Robertson turned 32 early in the 1970-71 season, and was past his prime when he came to Milwaukee, but his versatile skills and experience provided a leadership role for the Bucks. Robertson had never won a championship and his desire to win seemed to inspire Abdul-Jabbar and unite the rest of the Bucks. Robertson ranked third in the league in assists at 8.3 apg and was the Bucks' No. 2 scorer at 19.4 ppg.